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Table of contents
PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

 

It is also beginning to be felt that, especially as regards women, 

ignorant innocence is not merely too fragile a possession to be worth 

preservation, but that it is positively mischievous, since it involves the 

lack of necessary knowledge. "It is little short of criminal," writes Dr. 

F.M. Goodchild,[21] "to send our young people into the midst of the 

excitements and temptations of a great city with no more preparation than 

if they were going to live in Paradise." In the case of women, ignorance 

has the further disadvantage that it deprives them of the knowledge 

necessary for intelligent sympathy with other women. The unsympathetic 

attitude of women towards women is often largely due to sheer ignorance of 

the facts of life. "Why," writes in a private letter a married lady who 

keenly realizes this, "are women brought up with such a profound ignorance 

of their own and especially other women's natures? They do not know half 

as much about other women as a man of the most average capacity learns in 

his day's march." We try to make up for our failure to educate women in 

the essential matters of sex by imposing upon the police and other 

guardians of public order the duty of protecting women and morals. But, as 

Moll insists, the real problem of chastity lies, not in the multiplication 

of laws and policemen, but largely in women's knowledge of the dangers of 

sex and in the cultivation of their sense of responsibility.[22] We are 

always making laws for the protection of children and setting the police 

on guard. But laws and the police, whether their activities are good or 

bad, are in either case alike ineffectual. They can for the most part only 

be invoked when the damage is already done. We have to learn to go to the 

root of the matter. We have to teach children to be a law to themselves. 

We have to give them that knowledge which will enable them to guard their 

own personalities.[23] There is an authentic story of a lady who had 

learned to swim, much to the horror of her clergyman, who thought that 

swimming was unfeminine. "But," she said, "suppose I was drowning." "In 

that case," he replied, "you ought to wait until a man comes along and 

saves you." There we have the two methods of salvation which have been 

preached to women, the old method and the new. In no sea have women been 

more often in danger of drowning than that of sex. There ought to be no 

question as to which is the better method of salvation. 

 

It is difficult nowadays to find any serious arguments against 

the desirability of early sexual enlightenment, and it is almost 

with amusement that we read how the novelist Alphonse Daudet, 

when asked his opinion of such enlightenment, protested--in a 

spirit certainly common among the men of his time--that it was 

unnecessary, because boys could learn everything from the streets 

and the newspapers, while "as to young girls--no! I would teach 

them none of the truths of physiology. I can only see 

disadvantages in such a proceeding. These truths are ugly, 

disillusioning, sure to shock, to frighten, to disgust the mind, 

the nature, of a girl." It is as much as to say that there is no 

need to supply sources of pure water when there are puddles in 

the street that anyone can drink of. A contemporary of Daudet's, 

who possessed a far finer spiritual insight, Coventry Patmore, 

the poet, in the essay on "Ancient and Modern Ideas of Purity" in 

his beautiful book, _Religio Poetae_, had already finely protested 

against that "disease of impurity" which comes of "our modern 

undivine silences" for which Daudet pleaded. And Metchnikoff, 


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