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Table of contents
PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

has a penis, and is in any case ignorant of the vagina, concludes 

that the baby is brought into the world by an action analogous to 

the action of the bowels. The third theory, which is perhaps less 

prevalent than the others, Freud terms the sadistic theory of 

coitus. The child realizes that his father must have taken some 

sort of part in his production. The theory that sexual 

intercourse consists in violence has in it a trace of truth, but 

seems to be arrived at rather obscurely. The child's own sexual 

feelings are often aroused for the first time when wrestling or 

struggling with a companion; he may see his mother, also, 

resisting more or less playfully a sudden caress from his father, 

and if a real quarrel takes place, the impression may be 

fortified. As to what the state of marriage consists in, Freud 

finds that it is usually regarded as a state which abolishes 

modesty; the most prevalent theory being that marriage means that 

people can make water before each other, while another common 

childish theory is that marriage is when people can show each 

other their private parts. 

 

Thus it is that at a very early stage of the child's life we are brought 

face to face with the question how we may most wisely begin his initiation 

into the knowledge of the great central facts of sex. It is perhaps a 

little late in the day to regard it as a question, but so it is among us, 

although three thousand five hundred years ago, the Egyptian father spoke 

to his child: "I have given you a mother who has carried you within her, a 

heavy burden, for your sake, and without resting on me. When at last you 

were born, she indeed submitted herself to the yoke, for during three 

years were her nipples in your mouth. Your excrements never turned her 

stomach, nor made her say, 'What am I doing?' When you were sent to school 

she went regularly every day to carry the household bread and beer to your 

master. When in your turn you marry and have a child, bring up your child 

as your mother brought you up."[20] 

 

I take it for granted, however, that--whatever doubt there may be as to 

the how or the when--no doubt is any longer possible as to the absolute 

necessity of taking deliberate and active part in this sexual initiation, 

instead of leaving it to the chance revelation of ignorant and perhaps 

vicious companions or servants. It is becoming more and more widely felt 

that the risks of ignorant innocence are too great. 

 

"All the love and solicitude parental yearning can bestow," 

writes Dr. G.F. Butler, of Chicago (_Love and its Affinities_, 

1899, p. 83), "all that the most refined religious influence can 

offer, all that the most cultivated associations can accomplish, 

in one fatal moment may be obliterated. There is no room for 

ethical reasoning, indeed oftentimes no consciousness of wrong, 

but only Margaret's 'Es war so suess'." The same writer adds (as 

had been previously remarked by Mrs. Craik and others) that among 

church members it is the finer and more sensitive organizations 

that are the most susceptible to sexual emotions. So far as boys 

are concerned, we leave instruction in matters of sex, the most 

sacred and central fact in the world, as Canon Lyttelton remarks, 

to "dirty-minded school-boys, grooms, garden-boys, anyone, in 

short, who at an early age may be sufficiently defiled and 

sufficiently reckless to talk of them." And, so far as girls are 

concerned, as Balzac long ago remarked, "a mother may bring up 

her daughter severely, and cover her beneath her wings for 


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