Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

in the stories told to children of the origin of babies (the 

stork is here precluded, for it only extends to the southern 

border of Scandinavian lands). In North Iceland it is said that 

God made the baby and the mother bore it, and on that account is 

now ill. In the northwest it is said that God made the baby and 

gave it to the mother. Elsewhere it is said that God sent the 

baby and the midwife brought it, the mother only being in bed to 

be near the baby (which is seldom placed in a cradle). It is also 

sometimes said that a lamb or a bird brought the baby. Again it 

is said to have entered during the night through the window. 

Sometimes, however, the child is told that the baby came out of 

the mother's breasts, or from below her breasts, and that is why 

she is not well. 

 

Even when children learn that babies come out of the mother's 

body this knowledge often remains very vague and inaccurate. It 

very commonly happens, for instance, in all civilized countries 

that the navel is regarded as the baby's point of exit from the 

body. This is a natural conclusion, since the navel is seemingly 

a channel into the body, and a channel for which there is no 

obvious use, while the pudendal cleft would not suggest itself to 

girls (and still less to boys) as the gate of birth, since it 

already appears to be monopolized by the urinary excretion. This 

belief concerning the navel is sometimes preserved through the 

whole period of adolescence, especially in girls of the so-called 

educated class, who are too well-bred to discuss the matter with 

their married friends, and believe indeed that they are already 

sufficiently well informed. At this age the belief may not be 

altogether harmless, in so far as it leads to the real gate of 

sex being left unguarded. In Elsass where girls commonly believe, 

and are taught, that babies come through the navel, popular 

folk-tales are current (_Anthropophyteia_, vol. iii, p. 89) 

which represent the mistakes resulting from this belief as 

leading to the loss of virginity. 

 

Freud, who believes that children give little credit to the stork 

fable and similar stories invented for their mystification, has 

made an interesting psychological investigation into the real 

theories which children themselves, as the result of observation 

and thought, reach concerning the sexual facts of life (S. Freud, 

"Ueber Infantile Sexualtheorien," _Sexual-Probleme_, Dec., 1908). 

Such theories, he remarks, correspond to the brilliant, but 

defective hypotheses which primitive peoples arrive at concerning 

the nature and origin of the world. There are three theories, 

which, as Freud quite truly concludes, are very commonly formed 

by children. The first, and the most widely disseminated, is that 

there is no real anatomical difference between boys and girls; if 

the boy notices that his little sister has no obvious penis he 

even concludes that it is because she is too young, and the 

little girl herself takes the same view. The fact that in early 

life the clitoris is relatively larger and more penis-like helps 

to confirm this view which Freud connects with the tendency in 

later life to erotic dream of women furnished with a penis. This 

theory, as Freud also remarks, favors the growth of homosexuality 

when its germs are present. The second theory is the faecal theory 

of the origin of babies. The child, who perhaps thinks his mother 


Page 3 from 5:  Back   1   2  [3]  4   5   Forward