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Table of contents
PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

which treat sexual relations more frankly. At all events, if I 

have known Englishmen who were very debauched and very refined in 

vice, I have also known young men of the same nation, over 

twenty, who were as innocent as children, but never a young 

Frenchman, Italian, or Spaniard of whom this could be said." 

There is undoubtedly truth in this statement, though it must be 

remembered that, excellent as chastity is, if it is based on mere 

ignorance, its possessor is exposed to terrible dangers. 

 

The question of sexual hygiene, more especially in its special aspect of 

sexual enlightenment, is not, however, dependent on the fact that in some 

children the psychic and nervous manifestation of sex appears at an 

earlier age than in others. It rests upon the larger general fact that in 

all children the activity of intelligence begins to work at a very early 

age, and that this activity tends to manifest itself in an inquisitive 

desire to know many elementary facts of life which are really dependent on 

sex. The primary and most universal of these desires is the desire to know 

where children come from. No question could be more natural; the question 

of origins is necessarily a fundamental one in childish philosophies as, 

in more ultimate shapes, it is in adult philosophies. Most children, 

either guided by the statements, usually the misstatements, of their 

elders, or by their own intelligence working amid such indications as are 

open to them, are in possession of a theory of the origin of babies. 

 

Stanley Hall ("Contents of Children's Minds on Entering School," 

_Pedagogical Seminary_, June, 1891) has collected some of the 

beliefs of young children as to the origin of babies. "God makes 

babies in heaven, though the Holy Mother and even Santa Claus 

make some. He lets them down and drops them, and the women or 

doctors catch them, or He leaves them on the sidewalk, or brings 

them down a wooden ladder backwards and pulls it up again, or 

mamma or the doctor or the nurse go up and fetch them, sometimes 

in a balloon, or they fly down and lose off their wings in some 

place or other and forget it, and jump down to Jesus, who gives 

them around. They were also often said to be found in 

flour-barrels, and the flour sticks ever so long, you know, or 

they grew in cabbages, or God puts them in water, perhaps in the 

sewer, and the doctor gets them out and takes them to sick folks 

that want them, or the milkman brings them early in the morning; 

they are dug out of the ground, or bought at the baby store." 

 

In England and America the inquisitive child is often told that 

the baby was found in the garden, under a gooseberry bush or 

elsewhere; or more commonly it is said, with what is doubtless 

felt to be a nearer approach to the truth, that the doctor 

brought it. In Germany the common story told to children is that 

the stork brings the baby. Various theories, mostly based on 

folk-lore, have been put forward to explain this story, but none 

of them seem quite convincing (see, e.g., G. Herman, 

"Sexual-Mythen," _Geschlecht und Gesellschaft_, vol. i, Heft 5, 

1906, p. 176, and P. Naecke, _Neurologische Centralblatt_, No. 17, 

1907). Naecke thinks there is some plausibility in Professor 

Petermann's suggestion that a frog writhing in a stork's bill 

resembles a tiny human creature. 

 

In Iceland, according to Max Bartels ("Islaendischer Brauch und 

Volksglaube," etc., _Zeitschrift fuer Ethnologie_, 1900, Heft 2 

and 3) we find a transition between the natural and the fanciful 


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