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Table of contents
PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

and girls of three and four doing the same in the presence of 

their parents, with only a laughing rebuke. "Playing at pa and 

ma" is indeed extremely common among children in genuine 

innocence, and with a complete absence of viciousness; and is by 

no means confined to children of low social class. Moll remarks 

on its frequency (_Libido Sexualis_, Bd. i, p. 277), and the 

committee of evangelical pastors, in their investigation of 

German rural morality (_Die Geschlechtliche-sittliche 

Verhaeltnisse_, Bd. i, p. 102) found that children who are not yet 

of school age make attempts at coitus. The sexual play of 

children is by no means confined to father and mother games; 

frequently there are games of school with the climax in exposure 

and smackings, and occasionally there are games of being doctors 

and making examinations. Thus a young English woman says: "Of 

course, when we were at school [at the age of twelve and earlier] 

we used to play with one another, several of us girls; we used to 

go into a field and pretend we were doctors and had to examine 

one another, and then we used to pull up one another's clothes 

and feel each other." 

 

These games do not necessarily involve the cooeperation of the 

sexual impulse, and still less have they any element of love. But 

emotions of love, scarcely if at all distinguishable from adult 

sexual love, frequently appear at equally early ages. They are of 

the nature of play, in so far as play is a preparation for the 

activities of later life, though, unlike the games, they are not 

felt as play. Ramdohr, more than a century ago (_Venus Urania_, 

1798), referred to the frequent love of little boys for women. 

More usually the love is felt towards individuals of the opposite 

or the same sex who are not widely different in age, though 

usually older. The most comprehensive study of the matter has 

been made by Sanford Bell in America on a basis of as many as 

2,300 cases (S. Bell, "A Preliminary Study of the Emotion of Love 

Between the Sexes," _American Journal Psychology_, July, 1902). 

Bell finds that the presence of the emotion between three and 

eight years of age is shown by such actions as hugging, kissing, 

lifting each other, scuffling, sitting close to each other, 

confessions to each other and to others, talking about each other 

when apart, seeking each other and excluding the rest, grief at 

separation, giving gifts, showing special courtesies to each 

other, making sacrifices for each other, exhibiting jealousy. The 

girls are, on the whole, more aggressive than the boys, and less 

anxious to keep the matter secret. After the age of eight, the 

girls increase in modesty and the boys become still more 

secretive. The physical sensations are not usually located in the 

sexual organs; erection of the penis and hyperaemia of the female 

sexual parts Bell regards as marking undue precocity. But there 

is diffused vascular and nervous tumescence and a state of 

exaltation comparable, though not equal, to that experienced in 

adolescent and adult age. On the whole, as Bell soundly 

concludes, "love between children of opposite sex bears much the 

same relation to that between adults as the flower does to the 

fruit, and has about as little of physical sexuality in it as an 

apple-blossom has of the apple that develops from it." Moll also 

(op. cit. p. 76) considers that kissing and other similar 

superficial contacts, which he denominates the phenomena of 


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