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Table of contents
PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

acquire it by attracting the child's attention; they are merely 

reflex. It is believed by some, however, and notably by Freud, 

that certain manifestations of infant activity, especially 

thumb-sucking, are of sexual causation, and that the sexual 

impulse constantly manifests itself at a very early age. The 

belief that the sexual instinct is absent in childhood, Freud 

regards as a serious error, so easy to correct by observation 

that he wonders how it can have arisen. "In reality," he remarks, 

"the new-born infant brings sexuality with it into the world, 

sexual sensations accompany it through the days of lactation and 

childhood, and very few children can fail to experience sexual 

activities and feelings before the period of puberty" (Freud, 

"Zur Sexuellen Aufklaerung der Kinder," _Soziale Medizin und 

Hygiene_, Bd. ii, 1907; cf., for details, the same author's _Drei 

Abhandlungen zur Sexualtheorie_, 1905). Moll, on the other hand, 

considers that Freud's views on sexuality in infancy are 

exaggerations which must be decisively rejected, though he admits 

that it is difficult, if not impossible, to differentiate the 

feelings in childhood (Moll, _Das Sexualleben des Kindes_, p. 

154). Moll believes also that psycho-sexual manifestations 

appearing after the age of eight are not pathological; children 

who are weakly or of bad heredity are not seldom sexually 

precocious, but, on the other hand, Moll has known children of 

eight or nine with strongly developed sexual impulses, who yet 

become finely developed men. 

 

Rudimentary sexual activities in childhood, accompanied by sexual 

feelings, must indeed--when they are not too pronounced or too 

premature--be regarded as coming within the normal sphere, though 

when they occur in children of bad heredity they are not without 

serious risks. But in healthy children, after the age of seven or 

eight, they tend to produce no evil results, and are strictly of 

the nature of play. Play, both in animals and men, as Groos has 

shown with marvelous wealth of illustration, is a beneficent 

process of education; the young creature is thereby preparing 

itself for the exercise of those functions which in later life it 

must carry out more completely and more seriously. In his _Spiele 

der Menschen_, Groos applies this idea to the sexual play of 

children, and brings forward quotations from literature in 

evidence. Keller, in his "Romeo und Juliet auf dem Dorfe," has 

given an admirably truthful picture of these childish 

love-relationships. Emil Schultze-Malkowsky (_Geschlecht und 

Gesellschaft_, Bd. ii, p. 370) reproduces some scenes from the 

life of a little girl of seven clearly illustrating the exact 

nature of the sexual manifestation at this age. 

 

A kind of rudimentary sexual intercourse between children, as 

Bloch has remarked (_Beitraege_, etc., Bd. ii, p. 254), occurs in 

many parts of the world, and is recognized by their elders as 

play. This is, for instance, the case among the Bawenda of the 

Transvaal (_Zeitschrift fuer Ethnologie_, 1896, Heft 4, p. 364), 

and among the Papuans of Kaiser-Wilhelms-Land, with the approval 

of the parents, although much reticence is observed (id., 1889, 

Heft 1, p. 16). Godard (_Egypte et Palestine_, 1867, p. 105) 

noted the sexual play of the boys and girls in Cairo. In New 

Mexico W.A. Hammond (_Sexual Impotence_, p. 107) has seen boys 

and girls attempting a playful sexual conjunction with the 

encouragement of men and women, and in New York he has seen boys 


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