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Table of contents
PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

Vida en Madrid_, p. 254), "cannot be assimilated to a sale, nor to a 

contract of work, nor to any other form of barter recognized by the civil 

law. They consider that in these pacts there always enters an element 

which makes it much more like a gift in a matter in which no payment could 

be adequate. 'A woman's body is without price' is an axiom of 

prostitution. The money placed in the hands of her who procures the 

satisfaction of sexual desire is not the price of the act, but an offering 

which the priestess of Venus applies to her maintenance." To the Spaniard, 

it is true, every transaction which resembles trade is repugnant, but the 

principle underlying this feeling holds good of prostitution generally. 

 

[216] _Journal des Goncourt_, vol. iii; this was in 1866. 

 

[217] Rev. the Hon. C. Lyttelton, _Training of the Young in Laws of Sex_, 

p. 42. 

 

[218] See, e.g., R.W. Taylor, _Treatise on Sexual Disorders_, 1897, pp. 

74-5. Georg Hirth (_Wege zur Heimat_, 1909, p. 619) narrates the case of a 

young officer who, being excited by the caresses of his betrothed and 

having too much respect for her to go further than this, and too much 

respect for himself to resort to masturbation, knew nothing better than to 

go to a prostitute. Syphilis developed a few days after the wedding. Hirth 

adds, briefly, that the results were terrible. 

 

[219] It is an oft-quoted passage, but can scarcely be quoted too often: 

"You see that this wrought-iron plate is not quite flat: it sticks up a 

little, here towards the left--'cockles,' as we say. How shall we flatten 

it? Obviously, you reply, by hitting down on the part that is prominent. 

Well, here is a hammer, and I give the plate a blow as you advise. Harder, 

you say. Still no effect. Another stroke? Well, there is one, and another, 

and another. The prominence remains, you see: the evil is as great as 

ever--greater, indeed. But that is not all. Look at the warp which the 

plate has got near the opposite edge. Where it was flat before it is now 

curved. A pretty bungle we have made of it. Instead of curing the original 

defect we have produced a second. Had we asked an artisan practiced in 

'planishing,' as it is called, he would have told us that no good was to 

be done, but only mischief, by hitting down on the projecting part. He 

would have taught us how to give variously-directed and specially-adjusted 

blows with a hammer elsewhere: so attacking the evil, not by direct, but 

by indirect actions. The required process is less simple than you thought. 

Even a sheet of metal is not to be successfully dealt with after those 

common-sense methods in which you have so much confidence. What, then, 

shall we say about a society?... Is humanity more readily straightened 

than an iron plate?" (_The Study of Sociology_, p. 270.) 


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