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Table of contents
PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

 

[140] At Tralles, in Lydia, even in the second century A.D., as Sir W.M. 

Ramsay notes (_Cities of Phrygia_, vol. i, pp. 94, 115), sacred 

prostitution was still an honorable practice for women of good birth who 

"felt themselves called upon to live the divine life under the influence 

of divine inspiration." 

 

[141] The gradual secularization of prostitution from its earlier 

religious form has been traced by various writers (see, e.g., Dupouey, _La 

Prostitution dans l'Antiquite_). The earliest complimentary reference to 

the _Hetaira_ in literature is to be found, according to Benecke 

(_Antimachus of Colophon_, p. 36), in Bacchylides. 

 

[142] Cicero, _Oratio pro Coelio_, Cap. XX. 

 

[143] Pierre Dufour, _Histoire de la Prostitution_, vol. ii, Chs. XIX-XX. 

The real author of this well-known history of prostitution, which, though 

not scholarly in its methods, brings together a great mass of interesting 

information, is said to be Paul Lacroix. 

 

[144] Rabutaux, in his _Histoire de la Prostitution en Europe_, describes 

many attempts to suppress prostitution; cf. Dufour, _op. cit._, vol. iii. 

 

[145] Dufour, op. cit., vol. vi, Ch. XLI. It was in the reign of the 

homosexual Henry III that the tolerance of brothels was established. 

 

[146] In the eighteenth century, especially, houses of prostitution in 

Paris attained to an astonishing degree of elaboration and prosperity. 

Owing to the constant watchful attention of the police a vast amount of 

detailed information concerning these establishments was accumulated, and 

during recent years much of it has been published. A summary of this 

literature will be found in Duehren's _Neue Forshungen ueber den Marquis de 

Sade und seine Zeit_, 1904, pp. 97 et seq. 

 

[147] Rabutaux, op. cit., p. 54. 

 

[148] Calza has written the history of Venetian prostitution; and some of 

the documents he found have been reproduced by Mantegazza, _Gli Amori 

degli Uomimi_, cap. XIV. At the beginning of the seventeenth century, a 

comparatively late period, Coryat visited Venice, and in his _Crudities_ 

gives a full and interesting account of its courtesans, who then numbered, 

he says, at least 20,000; the revenue they brought into the State 

maintained a dozen galleys. 

 

[149] J. Schrank, _Die Prostitution in Wien_, Bd. I, pp. 152-206. 

 

[150] U. Robert, _Les Signes d'Infamie au Moyen Age_, Ch. IV. 

 

[151] Rudeck (_Geschichte der oeffentlichen Sittlichkeit in Deutschland_, 

pp. 26-36) gives many details concerning the important part played by 

prostitutes and brothels in mediaeval German life. 

 

[152] They are described by Rabutaux, op. cit., pp. 90 _et seq._ 

 

[153] _L'Annee Sociologique_, seventh year, 1904, p. 440. 

 

[154] Bloch, _Der Ursprung der Syphilis_. As regards the German 

"Frauenhausen" see Max Bauer, _Das Geschlechtsleben in der Deutschen 

Vergangenheit_, pp. 133-214. In Paris, Dufour states (op. cit., vol. v, 

Ch. XXXIV), brothels under the ordinances of St. Louis had many rights 

which they lost at last in 1560, when they became merely tolerated houses, 

without statutes, special costumes, or confinement to special streets. 

 

[155] "Cortegiana, hoc est meretrix honesta," wrote Burchard, the Pope's 

Secretary, at the beginning of the sixteenth century, _Diarium_, ed. 

Thuasne, vol. ii, p. 442; other authorities are quoted by Thuasne in a 

note. 

 

 

[156] Burchard, _Diarium_, vol. iii, p. 167. Thuasne quotes other 

authorities in confirmation. 

 

[157] The example of Holland, where some large cities have adopted the 

regulation of prostitution and others have not, is instructive as regards 

the illusory nature of the advantages of regulation. In 1883 Dr. Despres 


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