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Table of contents
PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

[133] Herodotus, Bk. I, Ch. CXCIX; Baruch, Ch. VI, p. 43. Modern scholars 

confirm the statements of Herodotus from the study of Babylonian 

literature, though inclined to deny that religious prostitution occupied 

so large a place as he gives it. A tablet of the Gilgamash epic, according 

to Morris Jastrow, refers to prostitutes as attendants of the goddess 

Ishtar in the city Uruk (or Erech), which was thus a centre, and perhaps 

the chief centre, of the rites described by Herodotus (Morris Jastrow, 

_The Religion of Babylonia and Assyria_, 1898, p. 475). Ishtar was the 

goddess of fertility, the great mother goddess, and the prostitutes were 

priestesses, attached to her worship, who took part in ceremonies intended 

to symbolize fertility. These priestesses of Ishtar were known by the 

general name Kadishtu, "the holy ones" (op. cit., pp. 485, 660). 

 

[134] It is usual among modern writers to associate Aphrodite Pandemos, 

rather than Ourania, with venal or promiscuous sexuality, but this is a 

complete mistake, for the Aphrodite Pandemos was purely political and had 

no sexual significance. The mistake was introduced, perhaps intentionally, 

by Plato. It has been suggested that that arch-juggler, who disliked 

democratic ideas, purposely sought to pervert and vulgarize the conception 

of Aphrodite Pandemos (Farnell, _Cults of Greek States_, vol. ii, p. 660). 

 

[135] Athenaeus, Bk. xiii, cap. XXXII. It appears that the only other 

Hellenic community where the temple cult involved unchastity was a city of 

the Locri Epizephyrii (Farnell, op. cit., vol. ii, p. 636). 

 

[136] I do not say an earlier "promiscuity," for the theory of a primitive 

sexual promiscuity is now widely discredited, though there can be no 

reasonable doubt that the early prevalence of mother-right was more 

favorable to the sexual freedom of women than the later patriarchal 

system. Thus in very early Egyptian days a woman could give her favors to 

any man she chose by sending him her garment, even if she were married. In 

time the growth of the rights of men led to this being regarded as 

criminal, but the priestesses of Amen retained the privilege to the last, 

as being under divine protection (Flinders Petrie, _Egyptian Tales_, pp. 

10, 48). 

 

[137] It should be added that Farnell ("The Position of Women in Ancient 

Religion," _Archiv fuer Religionswissenschaft_, 1904, p. 88) seeks to 

explain the religious prostitution of Babylonia as a special religious 

modification of the custom of destroying virginity before marriage in 

order to safeguard the husband from the mystic dangers of defloration. 

E.S. Hartland, also ("Concerning the Rite at the Temple of Mylitta," 

_Anthropological Essays Presented to E.B. Tyler_, p. 189), suggests that 

this was a puberty rite connected with ceremonial defloration. This theory 

is not, however, generally accepted by Semitic scholars. 

 

[138] The girls of this tribe, who are remarkably pretty, after spending 

two or three years in thus amassing a little dowry, return home to marry, 

and are said to make model wives and mothers. They are described by 

Bertherand in Parent-Duchatelet, _La Prostitution a Paris_, vol. ii, p. 

539. 

 

[139] In Abyssinia (according to Fiaschi, _British Medical Journal_, March 

13, 1897), where prostitution has always been held in high esteem, the 

prostitutes, who are now subject to medical examination twice a week, 

still attach no disgrace to their profession, and easily find husbands 

afterwards. Potter (_Sohrab and Rustem_, pp. 168 et seq.) gives references 

as regards peoples, widely dispersed in the Old World and the New, among 

whom the young women have practiced prostitution to obtain a dowry. 


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