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Table of contents
PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

FOOTNOTES: 

 

[107] See, e.g., Cheetham's Hulsean Lectures, _The Mysteries, Pagan and 

Christian_, pp. 123, 136. 

 

[108] Hormayr's _Taschenbuch_, 1835, p. 255. Hagelstange, in a chapter on 

mediaeval festivals in his _Sueddeutsches Bauernleben im Mittelalter_, 

shows how, in these Christian orgies which were really of pagan origin, the 

German people reacted with tremendous and boisterous energy against the 

laborious and monotonous existence of everyday life. 

 

[109] This was clearly realized by the more intelligent upholders of the 

Feast of Fools. Austere persons wished to abolish this Feast, and in a 

remarkable petition sent up to the Theological Faculty of Paris (and 

quoted by Flogel, _Geschichte des Grotesk-Komischen_, fourth edition, p. 

204) the case for the Feast is thus presented: "We do this according to 

ancient custom, in order that folly, which is second nature to man and 

seems to be inborn, may at least once a year have free outlet. Wine casks 

would burst if we failed sometimes to remove the bung and let in air. Now 

we are all ill-bound casks and barrels which would let out the wine of 

wisdom if by constant devotion and fear of God we allowed it to ferment. 

We must let in air so that it may not be spoilt. Thus on some days we give 

ourselves up to sport, so that with the greater zeal we may afterwards 

return to the worship of God." The Feast of Fools was not suppressed until 

the middle of the sixteenth century, and relics of it persisted (as at 

Aix) till near the end of the eighteenth century. 

 

[110] A Meray, _La Vie au Temps des Libres Precheurs_, vol. ii, Ch. X. A 

good and scholarly account of the Feast of Fools is given by E.K. 

Chambers, _The Mediaeval Stage_, Ch. XIII. It is true that the Church and 

the early Fathers often anathematized the theatre. But Gregory of 

Nazianzen wished to found a Christian theatre; the Mediaeval Mysteries were 

certainly under the protection of the clergy; and St. Thomas Aquinas, the 

greatest of the schoolmen, only condemns the theatre with cautious 

qualifications. 

 

[111] Spencer and Gillen, _Northern Tribes of Central Australia_, Ch. XII. 

 

[112] _Journal Anthropological Institute_, July-Dec., 1904, p. 329. 

 

[113] Westermarck (_Origin and Development of the Moral Ideas_, vol. ii, 

pp. 283-9) shows how widespread is the custom of setting apart a 

periodical rest day. 

 

[114] A.E. Crawley, _The Mystic Rose_, pp. 273 et seq., Crawley brings 

into association with this function of great festivals the custom, found 

in some parts of the world, of exchanging wives at these times. "It has 

nothing whatever to do with the marriage system, except as breaking it for 

a season, women of forbidden degree being lent, on the same grounds as 

conventions and ordinary relations are broken at festivals of the 

Saturnalia type, the object being to change life and start afresh, by 

exchanging every thing one can, while the very act of exchange coincides 

with the other desire, to weld the community together" (Ib., p. 479). 

 

[115] See "The Analysis of the Sexual Impulse" in vol. iii of these 

_Studies_. 

 

[116] G. Murray, _Ancient Greek Literature_, p. 211. 

 

[117] The Greek drama probably arose out of a folk-festival of more or 

less sexual character, and it is even possible that the mediaeval drama had 

a somewhat similar origin (see Donaldson, _The Greek Theatre_; Gilbert 

Murray, loc. cit.; Karl Pearson, _The Chances of Death_, vol. ii, pp. 

135-6, 280 et seq.). 

 

[118] R. Canudo, "Les Choreges Francais," _Mercure de France_, May 1, 

1907, p. 180. 

 

[119] "This is, in fact," Cyples declares (_The Process of Human 

Experience_, p. 743), "Art's great function--to rehearse within us greater 


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