Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

All the considerations briefly indicated in the preceding pages--the 

fundamental sense of human equality generated by our civilization, the 

repugnance to cruelty which accompanies the refinement of urban life, the 

ugly contrast of extremes which shock our developing democratic 

tendencies, the growing sense of the rights of the individual to authority 

over his own person, the no less strongly emphasized right of the 

community to the best that the individual can yield--all these 

considerations are every day more strongly influencing the modern moralist 

to assume towards the prostitute an attitude altogether different from 

that of the morality which we derived from Cato and Augustine. He sees the 

question in a larger and more dynamic manner. Instead of declaring that it 

is well worth while to tolerate and at the same time to condemn the 

prostitute, in order to preserve the sanctity of the wife in her home, he 

is not only more inclined to regard each as the proper guardian of her own 

moral freedom, but he is less certain about the time-honored position of 

the prostitute, and moreover, by no means sure that the wife in the home 

may not be fully as much in need of rescuing as the prostitute in the 

street; he is prepared to consider whether reform in this matter is not 

most likely to take place in the shape of a fairer apportionment of sexual 

privileges and sexual duties to women generally, with an inevitably 

resultant elevation in the sexual lives of men also. 

 

The revolt of many serious reformers against the injustice and 

degradation now involved by our system of prostitution is so 

profound that some have declared themselves ready to accept any 

revolution of ideas which would bring about a more wholesome 

transmutation of moral values. "Better indeed were a saturnalia 

of _free_ men and women," exclaims Edward Carpenter (_Love's 

Coming of Age_, p. 62), "than the spectacle which, as it is, our 

great cities present at night." 

 

Even those who would be quite content with as conservative a 

treatment as possible of social institutions still cannot fail to 

realize that prostitution is unsatisfactory, unless we are 

content to make very humble claims of the sexual act. "The act of 

prostitution," Godfrey declares (_The Science of Sex_, p. 202), 

"may be physiologically complete, but it is complete in no other 

sense. All the moral and intellectual factors which combine with 

physical desire to form the perfect sexual attraction are absent. 

All the higher elements of love--admiration, respect, honor, and 

self-sacrificing devotion--are as foreign to prostitution as to 

the egoistic act of masturbation. The principal drawbacks to the 

morality of the act lie in its associations more than in the act 

itself. Any affectional quality which a more or less promiscuous 

connection might possess is at once destroyed by the intrusion of 

the monetary element. In the resulting degradation the woman has 

the largest share, since it makes her a pariah and involves her 

in all the hardening and depraving influences of social 

ostracism. But her degradation only serves to render her 

influence on her partners more demoralizing. Prostitution," he 

concludes, "has a strong tendency towards emphasizing the 

naturally selfish attitude of men towards women, and encouraging 

them in the delusion, born of unregulated passions, that the 

sexual act itself is the aim and end of the sex life. 

Prostitution can therefore make no claim to afford even a 

temporary solution to the sex problem. It fulfils only that 


Page 1 from 4: [1]  2   3   4   Forward