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Table of contents
PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

the eminent sociologist Tarde ("La Morale Sexuelle," _Archives 

d'Anthropologie Criminelle_, January, 1907), "either prostitution 

will disappear through continuing to be dishonorable and will be 

replaced by some other institution which will better remedy the 

defects of monogamous marriage, or it will survive by becoming 

respectable, that is to say, by making itself respected, whether 

liked or disliked." Tarde thought this might perhaps come about 

by a better organization of prostitutes, a more careful selection 

among those who desired admission to their ranks and the 

cultivation of professional virtues which would raise their moral 

level. "If courtesans fulfil a need," Balzac had already said in 

his _Physiologie du Mariage_, "they must become an institution." 

 

This moral attitude is supported and enforced by the inevitable democratic 

tendency of civilization which, although it by no means destroys the idea 

of class, undermines that idea as the mark of fundamental human 

distinctions and renders it superficial. Prostitution no longer makes a 

woman a slave; it ought not to make her even a pariah: "My body is my 

own," said the young German prostitute of to-day, "and what I do with it 

is nobody else's concern." When the prostitute was literally a slave moral 

duty towards her was by no means necessarily identical with moral duty 

towards the free woman. But when, even in the same family, the prostitute 

may be separated by a great and impassable social gulf from her married 

sister, it becomes possible to see, and in the opinion of many 

imperatively necessary to see, that a readjustment of moral values is 

required. For thousands of years prostitution has been defended on the 

ground that the prostitute is necessary to ensure the "purity of women." 

In a democratic age it begins to be realized that prostitutes also are 

women. 

 

The developing sense of a fundamental human equality underlying the 

surface divisions of class tends to make the usual attitude towards the 

prostitute, the attitude of her clients even more than that of society 

generally, seem painfully cruel. The callous and coarsely frivolous tone 

of so many young men about prostitutes, it has been said, is "simply 

cruelty of a peculiarly brutal kind," not to be discerned in any other 

relation of life.[217] And if this attitude is cruel even in speech it is 

still more cruel in action, whatever attempts may be made to disguise its 

cruelty. 

 

Canon Lyttelton's remarks may be taken to refer chiefly to young 

men of the upper middle class. Concerning what is perhaps the 

usual attitude of lower middle class people towards prostitution, 

I may quote from a remarkable communication which has reached me 

from Australia: "What are the views of a young man brought up in 

a middle-class Christian English family on prostitutes? Take my 

father, for instance. He first mentioned prostitutes to me, if I 

remember rightly, when speaking of his life before marriage. And 

he spoke of them as he would speak of a horse he had hired, paid 

for, and dismissed from his mind when it had rendered him 

service. Although my mother was so kind and good she spoke of 

abandoned women with disgust and scorn as of some unclean animal. 

As it flatters vanity and pride to be able with good countenance 

and universal consent to look down on something, I soon grasped 

the situation and adopted an attitude which is, in the main, that 

of most middle-class Christian Englishmen towards prostitutes. 

But as puberty develops this attitude has to be accommodated with 


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