Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

their highest worth--an independence from the oppressive rule of 

man and of household duties, and a part of the feminine endowment 

which is so often crippled comes in them to brilliant 

development. Prostitution in its best form may thus offer a path 

by which these feminine characteristics may exert a certain 

influence on the development of civilization. We may also believe 

that the artistic activity of women is in some measure able to 

offer a counterpoise to the otherwise less pleasant results of 

sexual abandonment, preventing the coarsening and destruction of 

the emotional life; in his _Magda_ Sudermann has described a type 

of woman who, from the standpoint of strict morality, is open to 

condemnation, but in her art finds a foothold, the strength of 

which even ill-will must unwillingly recognize." In his _Sex and 

Character_, Weininger has developed in a more extreme and 

extravagant manner the conception of the prostitute as a 

fundamental and essential part of life, a permanent feminine 

type. 

 

There are others, apparently in increasing numbers, who approach the 

problem of prostitution not from an aesthetic standpoint but from a moral 

standpoint. This moral attitude is not, however, that conventionalized 

morality of Cato and St. Augustine and Lecky, set forth in previous pages, 

according to which the prostitute in the street must be accepted as the 

guardian of the wife in the home. These moralists reject indeed the claim 

of that belief to be considered moral at all. They hold that it is not 

morally possible that the honor of some women shall be purchaseable at the 

price of the dishonor of other women, because at such a price virtue loses 

all moral worth. When they read that, as Goncourt stated, "the most 

luxurious articles of women's _trousseaux_, the bridal chemises of girls 

with dowries of six hundred thousand francs, are made in the prison of 

Clairvaux,"[216] they see the symbol of the intimate dependence of our 

luxurious virtue on our squalid vice. And while they accept the 

historical and sociological evidence which shows that prostitution is an 

inevitable part of the marriage system which still survives among us, they 

ask whether it is not possible so to modify our marriage system that it 

shall not be necessary to divide feminine humanity into "disreputable" 

women, who make sacrifices which it is dishonorable to make, and 

"respectable" women, who take sacrifices which it cannot be less 

dishonorable to accept. 

 

Prostitutes, a distinguished man of science has said (Duclaux, 

_L'Hygiene Sociale_, p. 243), "have become things which the 

public uses when it wants them, and throws on the dungheap when 

it has made them vile. In its pharisaism it even has the 

insolence to treat their trade as shameful, as though it were not 

just as shameful to buy as to sell in this market." Bloch 

(_Sexualleben unserer Zeit_, Ch. XV) insists that prostitution 

must be ennobled, and that only so can it be even diminished. 

Isidore Dyer, of New Orleans, also argues that we cannot check 

prostitution unless we create "in the minds of men and women a 

spirit of tolerance instead of intolerance of fallen women." This 

point may be illustrated by a remark by the prostitute author of 

the _Tagebuch einer Verlorenen_. "If the profession of yielding 

the body ceased to be a shameful one," she wrote, "the army of 

'unfortunates' would diminish by four-fifths--I will even say 

nine-tenths. Myself, for example! How gladly would I take a 

situation as companion or governess!" "One of two things," wrote 


Page 2 from 4:  Back   1  [2]  3   4   Forward