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Table of contents
PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

 

 

In some respects the position of the ancient Greek _hetaira_ was 

more analogous to that of the Japanese _geisha_ than to that of 

the prostitute in the strict sense. For the Greeks, indeed, the 

_hetaira_, was not strictly a _porne_ or prostitute at all. The 

name meant friend or companion, and the woman to whom the name 

was applied held an honorable position, which could not be 

accorded to the mere prostitute. Athenaeus (Bk. xiii, Chs. 

XXVIII-XXX) brings together passages showing that the _hetaira_ 

could be regarded as an independent citizen, pure, simple, and 

virtuous, altogether distinct from the common crew of 

prostitutes, though these might ape her name. The _hetairae_ "were 

almost the only Greek women," says Donaldson (_Woman_, p. 59), 

"who exhibited what was best and noblest in women's nature." This 

fact renders it more intelligible why a woman of such 

intellectual distinction as Aspasia should have been a _hetaira_. 

There seems little doubt as to her intellectual distinction. 

"AEschines, in his dialogue entitled 'Aspasia,'" writes Gomperz, 

the historian of Greek philosophy (_Greek Thinkers_, vol. iii, 

pp. 124 and 343), "puts in the mouth of that distinguished woman 

an incisive criticism of the mode of life traditional for her 

sex. It would be exceedingly strange," Gomperz adds, in arguing 

that an inference may thus be drawn concerning the historical 

Aspasia, "if three authors--Plato, Xenophon and AEschines--had 

agreed in fictitiously enduing the companion of Pericles with 

what we might very reasonably have expected her to possess--a 

highly cultivated mind and intellectual influence." It is even 

possible that the movement for woman's right which, as we dimly 

divine through the pages of Aristophanes, took place in Athens in 

the fourth century B.C., was led by _hetairae_. According to Ivo 

Bruns (_Frauenemancipation in Athen_, 1900, p. 19) "the most 

certain information which we possess concerning Aspasia bears a 

strong resemblance to the picture which Euripides and 

Aristophanes present to us of the leaders of the woman movement." 

It was the existence of this movement which made Plato's ideas on 

the community of women appear far less absurd than they do to us. 

It may perhaps be thought by some that this movement represented 

on a higher plane that love of distruction, or, as we should 

better say, that spirit of revolt and aspiration, which Simmel 

finds to mark the intellectual and artistic activity of those who 

are unclassed or dubiously classed in the social hierarchy. Ninon 

de Lenclos, as we have seen, was not strictly a courtesan, but 

she was a pioneer in the assertion of woman's rights. Aphra Behn 

who, a little later in England, occupied a similarly dubious 

social position, was likewise a pioneer in generous humanitarian 

aspirations, which have since been adopted in the world at 

large. 

 

These refinements of prostitution may be said to be chiefly the 

outcome of the late and more developed stages in civilization. As 

Schurtz has put it (_Altersklassen und Maennerbuende_, p. 191): 

"The cheerful, skilful and artistically accomplished _hetaira_ 

frequently stands as an ideal figure in opposition to the 

intellectually uncultivated wife banished to the interior of the 

house. The courtesan of the Italian Renaissance, Japanese 

geishas, Chinese flower-girls, and Indian bayaderas, all show 

some not unnoble features, the breath of a free artistic 

existence. They have achieved--with, it is true, the sacrifice of 


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