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Table of contents
PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

 

 

The annual reports of the English factory inspectors serve to 

bring ridicule on this law, which looks so wisely humane and yet 

means nothing, but have so far been powerless to effect any 

change. These reports show, moreover, that the difficulty is 

increasing in magnitude. Thus Miss Martindale, a factory 

inspector, states that in all the towns she visits, from a quiet 

cathedral city to a large manufacturing town, the employment of 

married women is rapidly increasing; they have worked in mills or 

factories all their lives and are quite unaccustomed to cooking, 

housework and the rearing of children, so that after marriage, 

even when not compelled by poverty, they prefer to go on working 

as before. Miss Vines, another factory inspector, repeats the 

remark of a woman worker in a factory. "I do not need to work, 

but I do not like staying at home," while another woman said, "I 

would rather be at work a hundred times than at home. I get lost 

at home" (_Annual Report Chief Inspector of Factories and 

Workshops for 1906_, pp. 325, etc.). 

 

It may be added that not only is the English law enjoining four 

weeks' rest on the mother after childbirth practically 

inoperative, but the period itself is absurdly inadequate. As a 

rest for the mother it is indeed sufficient, but the State is 

still more interested in the child than in its mother, and the 

child needs the mother's chief care for a much longer period than 

four weeks. Helme advocates the State prohibition of women's work 

for at least six months after confinement. Where nurseries are 

attached to factories, enabling the mother to suckle her infant 

in intervals of work, the period may doubtless be shortened. 

 

It is important to remember that it is by no means only the women 

in factories who are induced to work as usual during the whole 

period of pregnancy, and to return to work immediately after the 

brief rest of confinement. The Research Committee of the 

Christian Social Union (London Branch) undertook, in 1905, an 

inquiry into the employment of women after childbirth. Women in 

factories and workshops were excluded from the inquiry which only 

had reference to women engaged in household duties, in home 

industries, and in casual work. It was found that the majority 

carry on their employment right up to the time of confinement and 

resume it from ten to fourteen days later. The infantile death 

rate for the children of women engaged only in household duties 

was greatly lower than that for the children of the other women, 

while, as ever, the hand-fed infants had a vastly higher death 

rate than the breast-fed infants (_British Medical Journal_, Oct. 

24, 1908, p. 1297). 

 

In the great French gun and armour-plate works at Creuzot (Saone 

et Loire) the salaries of expectant mothers among the employees 

are raised; arrangements are made for giving them proper advice 

and medical attendance; they are not allowed to work after the 

middle of pregnancy or to return to work after confinement 

without a medical certificate of fitness. The results are said to 

be excellent, not only on the health of the mothers, but in the 

diminution of premature births, the decrease of infantile deaths, 

and the general prevalence of breast-feeding. It would probably 

be hopeless to expect many employers in Anglo-Saxon lands to 

adopt this policy. They are too "practical," they know how small 

is the money-value of human lives. With us it is necessary for 

the State to intervene. 


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