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Table of contents
PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

In England, a well-informed writer remarks that "the value of 

marriage as a moral agent is evidenced by the fact that all the 

better-class prostitutes in London are almost entirely supported 

by married men," while in Germany, as stated in the interesting 

series of reminiscences by a former prostitute, Hedwig Hard's 

_Beichte einer Gefallenen_, (p. 208), the majority of the men who 

visit prostitutes are married. The estimate is probably 

excessive. Neisser states that only twenty-five per cent. of 

cases of gonorrhoea occur in married men. This indication is 

probably misleading in the opposite direction, as the married 

would be less reckless than the young and unmarried. As regards 

the motives which lead married men to prostitutes, Hedwig Hard 

narrates from her own experiences an incident which is 

instructive and no doubt typical. In the town in which she lived 

quietly as a prostitute a man of the best social class was 

introduced by a friend, and visited her habitually. She had often 

seen and admired his wife, who was one of the beauties of the 

place, and had two charming children; husband and wife seemed 

devoted to each other, and every one envied their happiness. He 

was a man of intellect and culture who encouraged Hedwig's love 

of books; she became greatly attached to him, and one day 

ventured to ask him how he could leave his lovely and charming 

wife to come to one who was not worthy to tie her shoe-lace. 

"Yes, my child," he answered, "but all her beauty and culture 

brings nothing to my heart. She is cold, cold as ice, proper, 

and, above all, phlegmatic. Pampered and spoilt, she lives only 

for herself; we are two good comrades, and nothing more. If, for 

instance, I come back from the club in the evening and go to her 

bed, perhaps a little excited, she becomes nervous and she thinks 

it improper to wake her. If I kiss her she defends herself, and 

tells me that I smell horribly of cigars and wine. And if perhaps 

I attempt more, she jumps out of bed, bristles up as though I 

were assaulting her, and threatens to throw herself out of the 

window if I touch her. So, for the sake of peace, I leave her 

alone and come to you." There can be no doubt whatever that this 

is the experience of many married men who would be well content 

to find the sweetheart as well as the friend in their wives. But 

the wives, from a variety of causes, have proved incapable of 

becoming the sexual mates of their husbands. And the husbands, 

without being carried away by any impulse of strong passion or 

any desire for infidelity, seek abroad what they cannot find at 

home. 

 

This is not the only reason why married men visit prostitutes. 

Even men who are happily married to women in all chief respects 

fitted to them, are apt to find, after some years of married 

life, a mysterious craving for variety. They are not tired of 

their wives, they have not the least wish or intention to abandon 

them, they will not, if they can help it, give them the slightest 

pain. But from time to time they are led by an almost 

irresistible and involuntary impulse to seek a temporary intimacy 

with women to whom nothing would persuade them to join themselves 

permanently. Pepys, whose _Diary_, in addition to its other 

claims upon us, is a psychological document of unique importance, 

furnishes a very characteristic example of this kind of impulse. 

He had married a young and charming wife, to whom he is greatly 

attached, and he lives happily with her, save for a few 


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