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Table of contents
PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

its socially beneficial character. Thus Charles Richard concludes 

his book on the subject with the words: "The conduct of society 

with regard to prostitution must proceed from the principle of 

gratitude without false shame for its utility, and compassion for 

the poor creatures at whose expense this is attained" (_La 

Prostitution devant le Philosophe_, 1882, p. 171). "To make 

marriage permanent is to make it difficult," an American medical 

writer observes; "to make it difficult is to defer it; to defer 

it is to maintain in the community an increasing number of 

sexually perfect individuals, with normal, or, in cases where 

repression is prolonged, excessive sexual appetites. The social 

evil is the natural outcome of the physical nature of man, his 

inherited impulses, and the artificial conditions under which he 

is compelled to live" ("The Social Evil," _Medicine_, August and 

September, 1906). Woods Hutchinson, while speaking with strong 

disapproval of prostitution and regarding prostitutes as "the 

worst specimens of the sex," yet regards prostitution as a social 

agency of the highest value. "From a medico-economic point of 

view I venture to claim it as one of the grand selective and 

eliminative agencies of nature, and of highest value to the 

community. It may be roughly characterized as a safety valve for 

the institution of marriage" (_The Gospel According to Darwin_, 

p. 193; cf. the same author's article on "The Economics of 

Prostitution," summarized in _Boston Medical and Surgical 

Journal_, November 21, 1895). Adolf Gerson, in a somewhat similar 

spirit, argues ("Die Ursache der Prostitution," 

_Sexual-Probleme_, September, 1908) that "prostitution is one of 

the means used by Nature to limit the procreative activity of 

men, and especially to postpone the period of sexual maturity." 

Molinari considers that the social benefits of prostitution have 

been manifested in various ways from the first; by sterilizing, 

for instance, the more excessive manifestations of the sexual 

impulse prostitution suppressed the necessity for the infanticide 

of superfluous children, and led to the prohibition of that 

primitive method of limiting the population (G. de Molinari, _La 

Viriculture_, p. 45). In quite another way than that mentioned by 

Molinari, prostitution has even in very recent times led to the 

abandonment of infanticide. In the Chinese province of Ping-Yang, 

Matignon states, it was usual not many years ago for poor parents 

to kill forty per cent. of the girl children, or even all of 

them, at birth, for they were too expensive to rear and brought 

nothing in, since men who wished to marry could easily obtain a 

wife in the neighboring province of Wenchu, where women were 

very easy to obtain. Now, however, the line of steamships along 

the coast makes it very easy for girls to reach the brothels of 

Shang-Hai, where they can earn money for their families; the 

custom of killing them has therefore died out (Matignon, 

_Archives d'Anthropologie Criminelle_, 1896, p. 72). "Under 

present conditions," writes Dr. F. Erhard ("Auch ein Wort zur 

Ehereform," _Geschlecht und Gesellschaft_, Jahrgang I, Heft 9), 

"prostitution (in the broadest sense, including free 

relationships) is necessary in order that young men may, in some 

degree, learn to know women, for conventional conversation cannot 

suffice for this; an exact knowledge of feminine thought and 

action is, however, necessary for a proper choice, since it is 


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