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Table of contents
PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

serious writer, is well illustrated in England by Burton, writing a 

century after the Reformation. He refers with mitigated approval to "our 

Pseudo-Catholics," who are severe with adultery but indulgent to 

fornication, being perhaps of Cato's mind that it should be encouraged to 

avoid worse mischiefs at home, and who holds brothels "as necessary as 

churches" and "have whole Colleges of Courtesans in their towns and 

cities." "They hold it impossible," he continues, "for idle persons, 

young, rich and lusty, so many servants, monks, friars, to live honest, 

too tyrannical a burden to compel them to be chaste, and most unfit to 

suffer poor men, younger brothers and soldiers at all to marry, as also 

diseased persons, votaries, priests, servants. Therefore as well to keep 

and ease the one as the other, they tolerate and wink at these kind of 

brothel-houses and stews. Many probable arguments they have to prove the 

lawfulness, the necessity, and a toleration of them, as of usery; and 

without question in policy they are not to be contradicted, but altogether 

in religion."[199] 

 

It was not until the beginning of the following century that the ancient 

argument of St. Augustine for the moral justification of prostitution was 

boldly and decisively stated in Protestant England, by Bernard Mandeville 

in his _Fable of the Bees_, and at its first promulgation it seemed so 

offensive to the public mind that the book was suppressed. "If courtesans 

and strumpets were to be prosecuted with as much rigor as some silly 

people would have it," Mandeville wrote, "what locks or bars would be 

sufficient to preserve the honor of our wives and daughters?... It is 

manifest that there is a necessity of sacrificing one part of womankind to 

preserve the other, and prevent a filthiness of a more heinous nature. 

From whence I think I may justly conclude that chastity may be supported 

by incontinence, and the best of virtues want the assistance of the worst 

of vices."[200] After Mandeville's time this view of prostitution began to 

become common in Protestant as well as in other countries, though it was 

not usually so clearly expressed. 

 

It may be of interest to gather together a few more modern 

examples of statements brought forward for the moral 

justification of prostitution. 

 

Thus in France Meusnier de Querlon, in his story of _Psaphion_, 

written in the middle of the eighteenth century, puts into the 

mouth of a Greek courtesan many interesting reflections 

concerning the life and position of the prostitute. She defends 

her profession with much skill, and argues that while men imagine 

that prostitutes are merely the despised victims of their 

pleasures, these would-be tyrants are really dupes who are 

ministering to the needs of the women they trample beneath their 

feet, and themselves equally deserve the contempt they bestow. 

"We return disgust for disgust, as they must surely perceive. We 

often abandon to them merely a statue, and while inflamed by 

their own desires they consume themselves on insensible charms, 

our tranquil coldness leisurely enjoys their sensibility. Then it 

is we resume all our rights. A little hot blood has brought 

these proud creatures to our feet, and rendered us mistresses of 

their fate. On which side, I ask, is the advantage?" But all men, 

she adds, are not so unjust towards the prostitute, and she 

proceeds to pronounce a eulogy, not without a slight touch of 

irony in it, of the utility, facility, and convenience of the 

brothel. 

 

A large number of the modern writers on prostitution insist on 


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