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Table of contents
PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

3. _The Moral Justification of Prostitution_.--There are and always have 

been moralists--many of them people whose opinions are deserving of the 

most serious respect--who consider that, allowing for the need of 

improved hygienic conditions, the existence of prostitution presents no 

serious problem for solution. It is, at most, they say, a necessary evil, 

and, at best, a beneficent institution, the bulwark of the home, the 

inevitable reverse of which monogamy is the obverse. "The immoral guardian 

of public morality," is the definition of prostitutes given by one writer, 

who takes the humble view of the matter, and another, taking the loftier 

ground, writes: "The prostitute fulfils a social mission. She is the 

guardian of virginal modesty, the channel to carry off adulterous desire, 

the protector of matrons who fear late maternity; it is her part to act as 

the shield of the family." "Female Decii," said Balzac in his _Physiologie 

du Mariage_ of prostitutes, "they sacrifice themselves for the republic 

and make of their bodies a rampart for the protection of respectable 

families." In the same way Schopenhauer called prostitutes "human 

sacrifices on the altar of monogamy." Lecky, again, in an oft-quoted 

passage of rhetoric,[191] may be said to combine both the higher and the 

lower view of the prostitute's mission in human society, to which he even 

seeks to give a hieratic character. "The supreme type of vice," he 

declared, "she is ultimately the most efficient guardian of virtue. But 

for her, the unchallenged purity of countless happy homes would be 

polluted, and not a few who, in the pride of their untempted chastity, 

think of her with an indignant shudder, would have known the agony of 

remorse and of despair. On that one degraded and ignoble form are 

concentrated the passions that might have filled the world with shame. She 

remains, while creeds and civilizations rise and fall, the eternal 

priestess of humanity, blasted for the sins of the people."[192] 

 

I am not aware that the Greeks were greatly concerned with the moral 

justification of prostitution. They had not allowed it to assume very 

offensive forms and for the most part they were content to accept it. The 

Romans usually accepted it, too, but, we gather, not quite so easily. 

There was an austerely serious, almost Puritanic, spirit in the Romans of 

the old stock and they seem sometimes to have felt the need to assure 

themselves that prostitution really was morally justifiable. It is 

significant to note that they were accustomed to remember that Cato was 

said to have expressed satisfaction on seeing a man emerge from a brothel, 

for otherwise he might have gone to lie with his neighbor's wife.[193] 

 

The social necessity of prostitution is the most ancient of all the 

arguments of moralists in favor of the toleration of prostitutes; and if 

we accept the eternal validity of the marriage system with which 

prostitution developed, and of the theoretical morality based on that 

system, this is an exceedingly forcible, if not an unanswerable, argument. 

 

The advent of Christianity, with its special attitude towards the "flesh," 

necessarily caused an enormous increase of attention to the moral aspects 

of prostitution. When prostitution was not morally denounced, it became 

clearly necessary to morally justify it; it was impossible for a Church, 

whose ideals were more or less ascetic, to be benevolently indifferent in 

such a matter. As a rule we seem to find throughout that while the more 

independent and irresponsible divines take the side of denunciation, those 

theologians who have had thrust upon them the grave responsibilities of 

ecclesiastical statesmanship have rather tended towards the reluctant 


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