Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

 

Morasso (_Archivio di Psichiatria_, 1896, fasc. I) has protested 

against a purely degenerative view of prostitutes on the strength 

of his own observations. There is, he states, a category of 

prostitutes, unknown to scientific inquirers, which he calls that 

of the _prostitute di alto bordo_. Among these the signs of 

degeneration, physical or moral, are not to be found in greater 

number than among women who do not belong to prostitution. They 

reveal all sorts of characters, some of them showing great 

refinement, and are chiefly marked off by the possession of an 

unusual degree of sexual appetite. Even among the more degraded 

group of the _bassa prostituzione_, he asserts, we find a 

predominance of sexual, as well as professional, characters, 

rather than the signs of degeneration. It is sufficient to quote 

one more testimony, as set down many years ago by a woman of high 

intelligence and character, Mrs. Craik, the novelist: "The women 

who fall are by no means the worst of their station," she wrote. 

"I have heard it affirmed by more than one lady--by one in 

particular whose experience was as large as her benevolence--that 

many of them are of the very best, refined, intelligent, 

truthful, and affectionate. 'I don't know how it is,' she would 

say, 'whether their very superiority makes them dissatisfied with 

their own rank--such brutes or clowns as laboring men often 

are!--so that they fall easier victims to the rank above them; or 

whether, though this theory will shock many people, other virtues 

can exist and flourish entirely distinct from, and after the 

loss of, that which we are accustomed to believe the 

indispensable prime virtue of our sex--chastity. I cannot explain 

it; I can only say that it is so, that some of my most promising 

village girls have been the first to come to harm; and some of 

the best and most faithful servants I ever had, have been girls 

who have fallen into shame, and who, had I not gone to the rescue 

and put them in the way to do well, would infallibly have become 

"lost women"'" (_A Woman's Thoughts About Women_, 1858, p. 291). 

Various writers have insisted on the good moral qualities of 

prostitutes. Thus in France, Despine first enumerates their vices 

as (1) greediness and love of drink, (2) lying, (3) anger, (4) 

want of order and untidiness, (5) mobility of character, (6) need 

of movement, (7) tendency to homosexuality; and then proceeds to 

detail their good qualities: their maternal and filial affection, 

their charity to each other; and their refusal to denounce each 

other; while they are frequently religious, sometimes modest, and 

generally very honest (Despine, _Psychologie Naturelle_, vol. 

iii, pp. 207 et seq.; as regards Sicilian prostitutes, cf. 

Callari, _Archivio di Psichiatria_, fasc. IV, 1903). The charity 

towards each other, often manifested in distress, is largely 

neutralized by a tendency to professional suspicion and jealousy 

of each other. 

 

Lombroso believes that the basis of prostitution must be found in 

moral idiocy. If by moral idiocy we are to understand a condition 

at all closely allied with insanity, this assertion is dubious. 

There seems no clear relationship between prostitution and 

insanity, and Tammeo has shown (_La Prostituzione_, p. 76) that 

the frequency of prostitutes in the various Italian provinces is 

in inverse ratio to the frequency of insane persons; as insanity 

increases, prostitution decreases. But if we mean a minor degree 


Page 1 from 6: [1]  2   3   4   5   6   Forward