Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

a demand, for which she is willingly paid, and for which she has 

to work (it has sometimes been noted that the prostitute looks 

down on the thief, who "does not work"); she is carrying on a 

profession, and is neither more nor less productive than those 

who carry on many more reputable professions. Aschaffenburg, also 

believing himself in opposition to Lombroso, argues, somewhat 

differently from Fere, that prostitution is not indeed, as Fere 

said, a form of criminality, but that it is too frequently united 

with criminality to be regarded as an equivalent. Moenkemoeller has 

more recently supported the same view. Here, however, as usual, 

there is a wide difference of opinion as to the proportion of 

prostitutes of whom this is true. It is recognized by all 

investigators to be true of a certain number, but while 

Baumgarten, from an examination of eight thousand prostitutes, 

only found a minute proportion who were criminals, Stroehmberg 

found that among 462 prostitutes there were as many as 175 

thieves. From another side, Morasso (as quoted in _Archivio di 

Psichiatria_, 1896, fasc. I), on the strength of his own 

investigations, is more clearly in opposition to Lombroso, since 

he protests altogether against any purely degenerative view of 

prostitutes which would in any way assimilate them with 

criminals. 

 

The question of the sexuality of prostitutes, which has a certain bearing 

on the question of their tendency to degeneration, has been settled by 

different writers in different senses. While some, like Morasso, assert 

that sexual impulse is a main cause inducing women to adopt a prostitute's 

career, others assert that prostitutes are usually almost devoid of sexual 

impulse. Lombroso refers to the prevalence of sexual frigidity among 

prostitutes.[177] In London, Merrick, speaking from a knowledge of over 

16,000 prostitutes, states that he has met with "only a very few cases" 

in which gross sexual desire has been the motive to adopt a life of 

prostitution. In Paris, Raciborski had stated at a much earlier period 

that "among prostitutes one finds very few who are prompted to libertinage 

by sexual ardor."[178] Commenge, again, a careful student of the Parisian 

prostitute, cannot admit that sexual desire is to be classed among the 

serious causes of prostitution. "I have made inquiries of thousands of 

women on this point," he states, "and only a very small number have told 

me that they were driven to prostitution for the satisfaction of sexual 

needs. Although girls who give themselves to prostitution are often 

lacking in frankness, on this point, I believe, they have no wish to 

deceive. When they have sexual needs they do not conceal them, but, on the 

contrary, show a certain _amour-propre_ in acknowledging them, as a 

sufficient sort of justification for their life; so that if only a very 

small minority avow this motive the reason is that for the great majority 

it has no existence." 

 

There can be no doubt that the statements made regarding the sexual 

frigidity of prostitutes are often much too unqualified. This is in part 

certainly due to the fact that they are usually made by those who speak 

from a knowledge of old prostitutes whose habitual familiarity with normal 

sexual intercourse in its least attractive aspects has resulted in 

complete indifference to such intercourse, so far as their clients are 

concerned.[179] It may be stated with truth that to the woman of deep 

passions the ephemeral and superficial relationships of prostitution can 


Page 2 from 5:  Back   1  [2]  3   4   5   Forward