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Table of contents
PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

 

 

 

2. _The Biological Factor of Prostitution_.--Economic considerations, as 

we see, have a highly important modificatory influence on prostitution, 

although it is by no means correct to assert that they form its main 

cause. There is another question which has exercised many investigators: 

To what extent are prostitutes predestined to this career by organic 

constitution? It is generally admitted that economic and other conditions 

are an exciting cause of prostitution; in how far are those who succumb 

predisposed by the possession of abnormal personal characteristics? Some 

inquirers have argued that this predisposition is so marked that 

prostitution may fairly be regarded as a feminine equivalent for 

criminality, and that in a family in which the men instinctively turn to 

crime, the women instinctively turn to prostitution. Others have as 

strenuously denied this conclusion. 

 

Lombroso has more especially advocated the doctrine that 

prostitution is the vicarious equivalent of criminality. In this 

he was developing the results reached, in the important study of 

the Jukes family, by Dugdale, who found that "there where the 

brothers commit crime, the sisters adopt prostitution;" the fines 

and imprisonments of the women of the family were not for 

violations of the right of property, but mainly for offences 

against public decency. "The psychological as well as anatomical 

identity of the criminal and the born prostitute," Lombroso and 

Ferrero concluded, "could not be more complete: both are 

identical with the moral insane, and therefore, according to the 

axiom, equal to each other. There is the same lack of moral 

sense, the same hardness of heart, the same precocious taste for 

evil, the same indifference to social infamy, the same 

volatility, love of idleness, and lack of foresight, the same 

taste for facile pleasures, for the orgy and for alcohol, the 

same, or almost the same, vanity. Prostitution is only the 

feminine side of criminality. And so true is it that prostitution 

and criminality are two analogous, or, so to say, parallel, 

phenomena, that at their extremes they meet. The prostitute is, 

therefore, psychologically a criminal: if she commits no offenses 

it is because her physical weakness, her small intelligence, the 

facility of acquiring what she wants by more easy methods, 

dispenses her from the necessity of crime, and on these very 

grounds prostitution represents the specific form of feminine 

criminality." The authors add that "prostitution is, in a certain 

sense, socially useful as an outlet for masculine sexuality and a 

preventive of crime" (Lombroso and Ferrero, _La Donna 

Delinquente_, 1893, p. 571). 

 

Those who have opposed this view have taken various grounds, and 

by no means always understood the position they are attacking. 

Thus W. Fischer (in _Die Prostitution_) vigorously argues that 

prostitution is not an inoffensive equivalent of criminality, but 

a factor of criminality. Fere, again (in _Degenerescence et 

Criminalite_), asserts that criminality and prostitution are not 

equivalent, but identical. "Prostitutes and criminals," he holds, 

"have as a common character their unproductiveness, and 

consequently they are both anti-social. Prostitution thus 

constitutes a form of criminality." The essential character of 

criminals is not, however, their unproductiveness, for that they 

share with a considerable proportion of the wealthiest of the 

upper classes; it must be added, also, that the prostitute, 

unlike the criminal, is exercising an activity for which there is 


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