Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

money anxieties than their mistresses. Moreover, they supply an 

almost universal demand, so that there is never any need for even 

very moderately competent servants to be in want of work. They 

constitute, it is true, a very large body which could not fail to 

supply a certain contingent of recruits to prostitution. But when 

we see that domestic service is the chief reservoir from which 

prostitutes are drawn, it should be clear that the craving for 

food and shelter is by no means the chief cause of prostitution. 

 

It may be added that, although the significance of this 

predominance of servants among prostitutes is seldom realized by 

those who fancy that to remove poverty is to abolish 

prostitution, it has not been ignored by the more thoughtful 

students of social questions. Thus Sherwell, while pointing out 

truly that, to a large extent, "morals fluctuate with trade," 

adds that, against the importance of the economic factor, it is a 

suggestive and in every way impressive fact that the majority of 

the girls who frequent the West End of London (88 per cent., 

according to the Salvation Army's Registers) are drawn from 

domestic service where the economic struggle is not severely felt 

(Arthur Sherwell, _Life in West London_, Ch. V, "Prostitution"). 

 

It is at the same time worthy of note that by the conditions of 

their lives servants, more than any other class, resemble 

prostitutes (Bernaldo de Quiros and Llanas Aguilaniedo have 

pointed this out in _La Mala Vida en Madrid_, p. 240). Like 

prostitutes, they are a class of women apart; they are not 

entitled to the considerations and the little courtesies usually 

paid to other women; in some countries they are even registered, 

like prostitutes; it is scarcely surprising that when they suffer 

from so many of the disadvantages of the prostitute, they should 

sometimes desire to possess also some of her advantages. Lily 

Braun (_Frauenfrage_, pp. 389 et seq.) has set forth in detail 

these unfavorable conditions of domestic labor as they bear on 

the tendency of servant-girls to become prostitutes. R. de 

Ryckere, in his important work, _La Servante Criminelle_ (1907, 

pp. 460 et seq.; cf., the same author's article, "La Criminalite 

Ancillaire," _Archives d'Anthropologie Criminelle_, July and 

December, 1906), has studied the psychology of the servant-girl. 

He finds that she is specially marked by lack of foresight, 

vanity, lack of invention, tendency to imitation, and mobility of 

mind. These are characters which ally her to the prostitute. De 

Ryckere estimates the proportion of former servants among 

prostitutes generally as fifty per cent., and adds that what is 

called the "white slavery" here finds its most complacent and 

docile victims. He remarks, however, that the servant prostitute 

is, on the whole, not so much immoral as non-moral. 

 

In Paris Parent-Duchatelet found that, in proportion to their 

number, servants furnished the largest contingent to 

prostitution, and his editors also found that they head the list 

(Parent-Duchatelet, edition 1857, vol. i, p. 83). Among 

clandestine prostitutes at Paris, Commenge has more recently 

found that former servants constitute forty per cent. In Bordeaux 

Jeannel (_De le Prostitution Publique_, p. 102) also found that 

in 1860 forty per cent, of prostitutes had been servants, 

seamstresses coming next with thirty-seven per cent. 

 

In Germany and Austria it has long been recognized that domestic 


Page 4 from 5:  Back   1   2   3  [4]  5   Forward