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Table of contents
PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

and social reformers, that while the pressure of poverty exerts a markedly 

modifying influence on prostitution, in that it increases the ranks of the 

women who thereby seek a livelihood and may thus be properly regarded as a 

factor of prostitution, no practicable raising of the rate of women's 

wages could possibly serve, directly and alone, to abolish prostitution. 

De Molinari, an economist, after remarking that "prostitution is an 

industry" and that if other competing industries can offer women 

sufficiently high pecuniary inducements they will not be so frequently 

attracted to prostitution, proceeds to point out that that by no means 

settles the question. "Like every other industry prostitution is governed 

by the demand of the need to which it responds. As long as that need and 

that demand persist, they will provoke an offer. It is the need and the 

demand that we must act on, and perhaps science will furnish us the means 

to do so."[173] In what way Molinari expects science to diminish the 

demand for prostitutes, however, is not clearly brought out. 

 

Not only have we to admit that no practicable rise in the rate of wages 

paid to women in ordinary industries can possibly compete with the wages 

which fairly attractive women of quite ordinary ability can earn by 

prostitution,[174] but we have also to realize that a rise in general 

prosperity--which alone can render a rise of women's wages healthy and 

normal--involves a rise in the wages of prostitution, and an increase in 

the number of prostitutes. So that if good wages is to be regarded as the 

antagonist of prostitution, we can only say that it more than gives back 

with one hand what it takes with the other. To so marked a degree is this 

the case that Despres in a detailed moral and demographic study of the 

distribution of prostitution in France comes to the conclusion that we 

must reverse the ancient doctrine that "poverty engenders prostitution" 

since prostitution regularly increases with wealth,[175] and as a 

departement rises in wealth and prosperity, so the number both of its 

inscribed and its free prostitutes rises also. There is indeed a fallacy 

here, for while it is true, as Despres argues, that wealth demands 

prostitution, it is also true that a wealthy community involves the 

extreme of poverty as well as of riches and that it is among the poorer 

elements that prostitution chiefly finds its recruits. The ancient dictum 

that "poverty engenders prostitution" still stands, but it is complicated 

and qualified by the complex conditions of civilization. Bonger, in his 

able discussion of the economic side of the question, has realized the 

wide and deep basis of prostitution when he reaches the conclusion that it 

is "on the one hand the inevitable complement of the existing legal 

monogamy, and on the other hand the result of the bad conditions in which 

many young girls grow up, the result of the physical and psychical 

wretchedness in which the women of the people live, and the consequence 

also of the inferior position of women in our actual society."[176] A 

narrowly economic consideration of prostitution can by no means bring us 

to the root of the matter. 

 

One circumstance alone should have sufficed to indicate that the 

inability of many women to secure "a living wage," is far from 

being the most fundamental cause of prostitution: a large 

proportion of prostitutes come from the ranks of domestic 

service. Of all the great groups of female workers, domestic 

servants are the freest from economic anxieties; they do not pay 

for food or for lodging; they often live as well as their 

mistresses, and in a large proportion of cases they have fewer 


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