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Table of contents
PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

London are said to be used by the girls for putting on, and finally 

washing off before going home, the customary paint.[170] It is certain 

that in England a large proportion of parents belonging to the working and 

even lower middle class ranks are unacquainted with the nature of the 

lives led by their own daughters. It must be added, also, that 

occasionally this conduct of the daughter is winked at or encouraged by 

the parents; thus a correspondent writes that he "knows some towns in 

England where prostitution is not regarded as anything disgraceful, and 

can remember many cases where the mother's house has been used by the 

daughter with the mother's knowledge." 

 

Acton, in a well-informed book on London prostitution, written in the 

middle of the last century, said that prostitution is "a transitory stage, 

through which an untold number of British women are ever on their 

passage."[171] This statement was strenuously denied at the time by many 

earnest moralists who refused to admit that it was possible for a woman 

who had sunk into so deep a pit of degradation ever to climb out again, 

respectably safe and sound. Yet it is certainly true as regards a 

considerable proportion of women, not only in England, but in other 

countries also. Thus Parent-Duchatelet, the greatest authority on French 

prostitution, stated that "prostitution is for the majority only a 

transitory stage; it is quitted usually during the first year; very few 

prostitutes continue until extinction." It is difficult, however, to 

ascertain precisely of how large a proportion this is true; there are no 

data which would serve as a basis for exact estimation,[172] and it is 

impossible to expect that respectable married women would admit that they 

had ever been "on the streets"; they would not, perhaps, always admit it 

even to themselves. 

 

The following case, though noted down over twenty years ago, is 

fairly typical of a certain class, among the lower ranks of 

prostitution, in which the economic factor counts for much, but 

in which we ought not too hastily to assume that it is the sole 

factor. 

 

Widow, aged thirty, with two children. Works in an umbrella 

manufactory in the East End of London, earning eighteen shillings 

a week by hard work, and increasing her income by occasionally 

going out on the streets in the evenings. She haunts a quiet side 

street which is one of the approaches to a large city railway 

terminus. She is a comfortable, almost matronly-looking woman, 

quietly dressed in a way that is only noticeable from the skirts 

being rather short. If spoken to she may remark that she is 

"waiting for a lady friend," talks in an affected way about the 

weather, and parenthetically introduces her offers. She will 

either lead a man into one of the silent neighboring lanes filled 

with warehouses, or will take him home with her. She is willing 

to accept any sum the man may be willing or able to give; 

occasionally it is a sovereign, sometimes it is only a sixpence; 

on an average she earns a few shillings in an evening. She had 

only been in London for ten months; before that she lived in 

Newcastle. She did not go on the streets there; "circumstances 

alter cases," she sagely remarks. Though not speaking well of 

the police, she says they do not interfere with her as they do 

with some of the girls. She never gives them money, but hints 

that it is sometimes necessary to gratify their desires in order 

to keep on good terms with them. 

 

It must always be remembered, for it is sometimes forgotten by socialists 


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