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Table of contents
PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

 

 

 

1. _The Economic Causation of Prostitution_.--Writers on prostitution 

frequently assert that economic conditions lie at the root of prostitution 

and that its chief cause is poverty, while prostitutes themselves often 

declare that the difficulty of earning a livelihood in other ways was a 

main cause in inducing them to adopt this career. "Of all the causes of 

prostitution," Parent-Duchatelet wrote a century ago, "particularly in 

Paris, and probably in all large cities, none is more active than lack of 

work and the misery which is the inevitable result of insufficient wages." 

In England, also, to a large extent, Sherwell states, "morals fluctuate 

with trade."[164] It is equally so in Berlin where the number of 

registered prostitutes increases during bad years.[165] It is so also in 

America. It is the same in Japan; "the cause of causes is poverty."[166] 

 

Thus the broad and general statement that prostitution is largely or 

mainly an economic phenomenon, due to the low wages of women or to sudden 

depressions in trade, is everywhere made by investigators. It must, 

however, be added that these general statements are considerably qualified 

in the light of the detailed investigations made by careful inquirers. 

Thus Stroehmberg, who minutely investigated 462 prostitutes, found that 

only one assigned destitution as the reason for adopting her career, and 

on investigation this was found to be an impudent lie.[167] Hammer found 

that of ninety registered German prostitutes not one had entered on the 

career out of want or to support a child, while some went on the street 

while in the possession of money, or without wishing to be paid.[168] 

Pastor Buschmann, of the Teltow Magdalene Home in Berlin, finds that it is 

not want but indifference to moral considerations which leads girls to 

become prostitutes. In Germany, before a girl is put on the police 

register, due care is always taken to give her a chance of entering a Home 

and getting work; in Berlin, in the course of ten years, only two 

girls--out of thousands--were willing to take advantage of this 

opportunity. The difficulty experienced by English Rescue Homes in finding 

girls who are willing to be "rescued" is notorious. The same difficulty is 

found in other cities, even where entirely different conditions prevail; 

thus it is found in Madrid, according to Bernaldo de Quiros and Llanas 

Aguilaniedo, that the prostitutes who enter the Homes, notwithstanding all 

the devotion of the nuns, on leaving at once return to their old life. 

While the economic factor in prostitution undoubtedly exists, the undue 

frequency and emphasis with which it is put forward and accepted is 

clearly due, in part to ignorance of the real facts, in part to the fact 

that such an assumption appeals to those whose weakness it is to explain 

all social phenomena by economic causes, and in part to its obvious 

plausibility.[169] 

 

Prostitutes are mainly recruited from the ranks of factory girls, domestic 

servants, shop girls, and waitresses. In some of these occupations it is 

difficult to obtain employment all the year round. In this way many 

milliners, dressmakers and tailoresses become prostitutes when business is 

slack, and return to business when the season begins. Sometimes the 

regular work of the day is supplemented concurrently by prostitution in 

the street in the evening. It is said, possibly with some truth, that 

amateur prostitution of this kind is extremely prevalent in England, as it 

is not checked by the precautions which, in countries where prostitution 

is regulated, the clandestine prostitute must adopt in order to avoid 

registration. Certain public lavatories and dressing-rooms in central 


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