Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

The rise of Christianity to political power produced on the whole less 

change of policy than might have been anticipated. The Christian rulers 

had to deal practically as best they might with a very mixed, turbulent, 

and semi-pagan world. The leading fathers of the Church were inclined to 

tolerate prostitution for the avoidance of greater evils, and Christian 

emperors, like their pagan predecessors, were willing to derive a tax from 

prostitution. The right of prostitution to exist was, however, no longer 

so unquestionably recognized as in pagan days, and from time to time some 

vigorous ruler sought to repress prostitution by severe enactments. The 

younger Theodosius and Valentinian definitely ordained that there should 

be no more brothels and that anyone giving shelter to a prostitute should 

be punished. Justinian confirmed that measure and ordered that all panders 

were to be exiled on pain of death. These enactments were quite vain. But 

during a thousand years they were repeated again and again in various 

parts of Europe, and invariably with the same fruitless or worse than 

fruitless results. Theodoric, king of the Visigoths, punished with death 

those who promoted prostitution, and Recared, a Catholic king of the same 

people in the sixth century, prohibited prostitution altogether and 

ordered that a prostitute, when found, should receive three hundred 

strokes of the whip and be driven out of the city. Charlemagne, as well as 

Genserich in Carthage, and later Frederick Barbarossa in Germany, made 

severe laws against prostitution which were all of no effect, for even if 

they seemed to be effective for the time the reaction was all the greater 

afterwards.[144] 

 

 

It is in France that the most persistent efforts have been made to combat 

prostitution. Most notable of all were the efforts of the King and Saint, 

Louis IX. In 1254 St. Louis ordained that prostitutes should be driven out 

altogether and deprived of all their money and goods, even to their 

mantles and gowns. In 1256 he repeated this ordinance and in 1269, before 

setting out for the Crusades, he ordered the destruction of all places of 

prostitution. The repetition of those decrees shows how ineffectual they 

were. They even made matters worse, for prostitutes were forced to mingle 

with the general population and their influence was thus extended. St. 

Louis was unable to put down prostitution even in his own camp in the 

East, and it existed outside his own tent. His legislation, however, was 

frequently imitated by subsequent rulers of France, even to the middle of 

the seventeenth century, always with the same ineffectual and worse 

results. In 1560 an edict of Charles IX abolished brothels, but the number 

of prostitutes was thereby increased rather than diminished, while many 

new kinds of brothels appeared in unsuspected shapes and were more 

dangerous than the more recognized brothels which had been 

suppressed.[145] In spite of all such legislation, or because of it, there 

has been no country in which prostitution has played a more conspicuous 

part.[146] 

 

At Mantua, so great was the repulsion aroused by prostitutes that they 

were compelled to buy in the markets any fruit or bread that had been 

soiled by the mere touch of their hands. It was so also in Avignon in 

1243. In Catalonia they could not sit at the same table as a lady or a 

knight or kiss any honorable person.[147] Even in Venice, the paradise of 

prostitution, numerous and severe regulations were passed against it, and 

it was long before the Venetian rulers resigned themselves to its 

toleration and regulation.[148] 

 

The last vigorous attempt to uproot prostitution in Europe was that of 


Page 1 from 5: [1]  2   3   4   5   Forward