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Table of contents
PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

Gahi [the courtesan, as an incarnation of the female demon, 

Gahi], O Spitama Zarathustra! who mixes in her the seed of the 

faithful and the unfaithful, of the worshipper of Mazda and the 

worshipper of the Daevas, of the wicked and the righteous. Her 

look dries up one-third of the mighty floods that run from the 

mountains, O Zarathustra; her look withers one-third of the 

beautiful, golden-hued, growing plants, O Zarathustra; her look 

withers one-third of the strength of Spenta Armaiti [the earth]; 

and her touch withers in the faithful one-third of his good 

thoughts, of his good words, of his good deeds, one-third of his 

strength, of his victorious power, of his holiness. Verily I say 

unto thee, O Spitama Zarathustra! such creatures ought to be 

killed even more than gliding snakes, than howling wolves, than 

the she-wolf that falls upon the fold, or than the she-frog that 

falls upon the waters with her thousandfold brood" (_Zend-Avesta, 

the Vendidad_, translated by James Darmesteter, Farfad XVIII). 

 

In practice, however, prostitution is well established in the 

modern East. Thus in the Tartar-Turcoman region houses of 

prostitution lying outside the paths frequented by Christians 

have been described by a writer who appears to be well informed 

("Orientalische Prostitution," _Geschlecht und Gesellschaft_, 

1907, Bd. ii, Heft 1). These houses are not regarded as immoral 

or forbidden, but as places in which the visitor will find a 

woman who gives him for a few hours the illusion of being in his 

own home, with the pleasure of enjoying her songs, dances, and 

recitations, and finally her body. Payment is made at the door, 

and no subsequent question of money arises; the visitor is 

henceforth among friends, almost as if in his own family. He 

treats the prostitute almost as if she were his wife, and no 

indecorum or coarseness of speech occurs. "There is no obscenity 

in the Oriental brothel." At the same time there is no artificial 

pretence of innocence. 

 

In Eastern Asia, among the peoples of Mongolian stock, especially 

in China, we find prostitution firmly established and organized 

on a practical business basis. Prostitution is here accepted and 

viewed with no serious disfavor, but the prostitute herself is, 

nevertheless, treated with contempt. Young children are 

frequently sold to be trained to a life of prostitution, educated 

accordingly, and kept shut up from the world. Young widows 

(remarriage being disapproved) frequently also slide into a life 

of prostitution. Chinese prostitutes often end through opium and 

the ravages of syphilis (see, e.g., Coltman's _The Chinese_, 

1900, Ch. VII). In ancient China, it is said prostitutes were a 

superior class and occupied a position somewhat similar to that 

of the _hetairae_ in Greece. Even in modern China, however, where 

they are very numerous, and the flower boats, in which in towns 

by the sea they usually live, very luxurious, it is chiefly for 

entertainment, according to some writers, that they are resorted 

to. Tschang Ki Tong, military attache in Paris (as quoted by 

Ploss and Bartels), describes the flower boat as less analogous 

to a European brothel than to a _cafe chantant_; the young 

Chinaman comes here for music, for tea, for agreeable 

conversation with the flower-maidens, who are by no means 

necessarily called upon to minister to the lust of their 

visitors. 

 

In Japan, the prostitute's lot is not so degraded as in China. 


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