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Table of contents
PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

"prostitution for money or gifts was quite unknown." Adultery 

after marriage was also unknown. But there was great freedom in 

the formation of sexual relationships before marriage (J. Stanley 

Gardiner, _Journal Anthropological Institute_, February, 1898, p. 

409). Much the same is said of the Bantu Ba mbola of Africa (_op. 

cit._, July-December, 1905, p. 410). 

 

Among the early Cymri of Wales, representing a more advanced 

social stage, prostitution appears to have been not absolutely 

unknown, but public prostitution was punished by loss of valuable 

privileges (R.B. Holt, "Marriage Laws and Customs of the Cymri," 

_Journal Anthropological Institute_, August-November, 1898, pp. 

161-163). 

 

Prostitution was practically unknown in Burmah, and regarded as 

shameful before the coming of the English and the example of the 

modern Hindus. The missionaries have unintentionally, but 

inevitably, favored the growth of prostitution by condemning free 

unions (_Archives d'Anthropologie Criminelle_, November, 1903, p. 

720). The English brought prostitution to India. "That was not 

specially the fault of the English," said a Brahmin to Jules 

Bois, "it is the crime of your civilization. We have never had 

prostitutes. I mean by that horrible word the brutalized servants 

of the gross desire of the passerby. We had, and we have, castes 

of singers and dancers who are married to trees--yes, to 

trees--by touching ceremonies which date from Vedic times; our 

priests bless them and receive much money from them. They do not 

refuse themselves to those who love them and please them. Kings 

have made them rich. They represent all the arts; they are the 

visible beauty of the universe" (Jules Bois, _Visions de l'Inde_, 

p. 55). 

 

Religious prostitutes, it may be added, "the servants of the 

god," are connected with temples in Southern India and the 

Deccan. They are devoted to their sacred calling from their 

earliest years, and it is their chief business to dance before 

the image of the god, to whom they are married (though in Upper 

India professional dancing girls are married to inanimate 

objects), but they are also trained in arousing and assuaging the 

desires of devotees who come on pilgrimage to the shrine. For the 

betrothal rites by which, in India, sacred prostitutes are 

consecrated, see, e.g., A. Van Gennep, _Rites de Passage_, p. 

142. 

 

In many parts of Western Asia, where barbarism had reached a high 

stage of development, prostitution was not unknown, though 

usually disapproved. The Hebrews knew it, and the historical 

Biblical references to prostitutes imply little reprobation. 

Jephtha was the son of a prostitute, brought up with the 

legitimate children, and the story of Tamar is instructive. But 

the legal codes were extremely severe on Jewish maidens who 

became prostitutes (the offense was quite tolerable in strange 

women), while Hebrew moralists exercised their invectives against 

prostitution; it is sufficient to refer to a well-known passage 

in the Book of Proverbs (see art. "Harlot," by Cheyne, in the 

_Encyclopaedia Biblica_). Mahomed also severely condemned 

prostitution, though somewhat more tolerant to it in slave 

women; according to Haleby, however, prostitution was practically 

unknown in Islam during the first centuries after the Prophet's 

time. 

 

The Persian adherents of the somewhat ascetic _Zendavesta_ also 

knew prostitution, and regarded it with repulsion: "It is the 


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