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Table of contents
PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

At a later period, in Corinth, prostitutes were still the priestesses of 

Venus, more or less loosely attached to her temples, and so long as that 

was the case they enjoyed a considerable degree of esteem. At this stage, 

however, we realize that religious prostitution was developing a 

utilitarian side. These temples flourished chiefly in sea-coast towns, in 

islands, in large cities to which many strangers and sailors came. The 

priestesses of Cyprus burnt incense on her altars and invoked her sacred 

aid, but at the same time Pindar addresses them as "young girls who 

welcome all strangers and give them hospitality." Side by side with the 

religious significance of the act of generation the needs of men far from 

home were already beginning to be definitely recognized. The Babylonian 

woman had gone to the temple of Mylitta to fulfil a personal religious 

duty; the Corinthian priestess had begun to act as an avowed minister to 

the sexual needs of men in strange cities. 

 

The custom which Herodotus noted in Lydia of young girls prostituting 

themselves in order to acquire a marriage portion which they may dispose 

of as they think fit (Bk. I, Ch. 93) may very well have developed (as 

Frazer also believes) out of religious prostitution; we can indeed trace 

its evolution in Cyprus where eventually, at the period when Justinian 

visited the island, the money given by strangers to the women was no 

longer placed on the altar but put into a chest to form marriage-portions 

for them. It is a custom to be found in Japan and various other parts of 

the world, notably among the Ouled-Nail of Algeria,[138] and is not 

necessarily always based on religious prostitution; but it obviously 

cannot exist except among peoples who see nothing very derogatory in free 

sexual intercourse for the purpose of obtaining money, so that the custom 

of Mylitta furnished a natural basis for it.[139] 

 

As a more spiritual conception of religion developed, and as the growth of 

civilization tended to deprive sexual intercourse of its sacred halo, 

religious prostitution in Greece was slowly abolished, though on the 

coasts of Asia Minor both religious prostitution and prostitution for the 

purpose of obtaining a marriage portion persisted to the time of 

Constantine, who put an end to these ancient customs.[140] Superstition 

was on the side of the old religious prostitution; it was believed that 

women who had never sacrificed to Aphrodite became consumed by lust, and 

according to the legend recorded by Ovid--a legend which seems to point to 

a certain antagonism between sacred and secular prostitution--this was the 

case with the women who first became public prostitutes. The decay of 

religious prostitution, doubtless combined with the cravings always born 

of the growth of civilization, led up to the first establishment, 

attributed by legend to Solon, of a public brothel, a purely secular 

establishment for a purely secular end: the safeguarding of the virtue of 

the general population and the increase of the public revenue. With that 

institution the evolution of prostitution, and of the modern marriage 

system of which it forms part, was completed. The Athenian _dikterion_ is 

the modern brothel; the _dikteriade_ is the modern state-regulated 

prostitute. The free _hetairae_, indeed, subsequently arose, educated women 

having no taint of the _dikterion_, but they likewise had no official part 

in public worship.[141] The primitive conception of the sanctity of sexual 

intercourse in the divine service had been utterly lost. 

 

A fairly typical example of the conditions existing among savages 

is to be found in the South Sea Island of Rotuma, where 


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