Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

they seek to provide for the remuneration of the mother during this 

enforced rest. In no country, indeed, is the principle carried out so 

thoroughly and for so long a period as is desirable. But it is the right 

principle, and embodies the germ which, in the future, will be developed. 

There can be little doubt that whatever are the matters, and they are 

certainly many, which may be safely left to the discretion of the 

individual, the care of the mother and her child is not among them. That 

is a matter which, more than any other, concerns the community as a whole, 

and the community cannot afford to be slack in asserting its authority 

over it. The State needs healthy men and women, and by any negligence in 

attending to this need it inflicts serious charges of all sorts upon 

itself, and at the same time dangerously impairs its efficiency in the 

world. Nations have begun to recognize the desirability of education, but 

they have scarcely yet begun to realize that the nationalization of health 

is even more important than the nationalization of education. If it were 

necessary to choose between the task of getting children educated and the 

task of getting them well-born and healthy it would be better to abandon 

education. There have been many great peoples who never dreamed of 

national systems of education; there has been no great people without the 

art of producing healthy and vigorous children. 

 

This matter becomes of peculiar importance in great industrial states like 

England, the United States, and Germany, because in such states a tacit 

conspiracy tends to grow up to subordinate national ends to individual 

ends, and practically to work for the deterioration of the race. In 

England, for instance, this tendency has become peculiarly well marked 

with disastrous results. The interest of the employed woman tends to 

become one with that of her employer; between them they combine to crush 

the interests of the child who represents the race, and to defeat the laws 

made in the interests of the race which are those of the community as a 

whole. The employed woman wishes to earn as much wages as she can and with 

as little interruption as she can; in gratifying that wish she is, at the 

same time, acting in the interests of the employer, who carefully avoids 

thwarting her. 

 

This impulse on the employed woman's part is by no means always and 

entirely the result of poverty, and would not, therefore, be removed by 

raising her wages. Long before marriage, when little more than a child, 

she has usually gone out to work, and work has become a second nature. She 

has mastered her work, she enjoys a certain position and what to her are 

high wages; she is among her friends and companions; the noise and bustle 

and excitement of the work-room or the factory have become an agreeable 

stimulant which she can no longer do without. On the other hand, her home 

means nothing to her; she only returns there to sleep, leaving it next 

morning at day-break or earlier; she is ignorant even of the simplest 

domestic arts; she moves about in her own home like a strange and awkward 

child. The mere act of marriage cannot change this state of things; 

however willing she may be at marriage to become a domesticated wife, she 

is destitute alike of the inclination or the skill for domesticity. Even 

in spite of herself she is driven back to the work-shop, to the one place 

where she feels really at home. 

 

In Germany women are not allowed to work for four weeks after 

confinement, nor during the following two weeks except by medical 

certificate. The obligatory insurance against disease which 


Page 4 from 5:  Back   1   2   3  [4]  5   Forward