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Table of contents
PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

chiefly supported by superstitions. Among many primitive peoples 

abstinence during the whole of pregnancy is enjoined because it is 

believed that the semen would kill the foetus.[12] 

 

The Talmud is unfavorable to coitus during pregnancy, and the 

Koran prohibits it during the whole of the period, as well as 

during suckling. Among the Hindus, on the other hand, intercourse 

is continued up to the last fortnight of pregnancy, and it is 

even believed that the injected semen helps to nourish the embryo 

(W.D. Sutherland, "Ueber das Alltagsleben und die Volksmedizin 

unter den Bauern Britischostindiens," _Muenchener Medizinische 

Wochenschrift_, Nos. 12 and 13, 1906). The great Indian physician 

Susruta, however, was opposed to coitus during pregnancy, and the 

Chinese are emphatically on the same side. 

 

As men have emerged from barbarism in the direction of civilization, the 

animal instinct of refusal after impregnation has been completely lost in 

women, while at the same time both sexes tend to become indifferent to 

those ritual restraints which at an earlier period were almost as binding 

as instinct. Sexual intercourse thus came to be practiced after 

impregnation, much the same as before, as part of ordinary "marital 

rights," though sometimes there has remained a faint suspicion, reflected 

in the hesitating attitude of the Catholic Church already alluded to, that 

such intercourse may be a sinful indulgence. Morality is, however, called 

in to fortify this indulgence. If the husband is shut out from marital 

intercourse at this time, it is argued, he will seek extra-marital 

intercourse, as indeed in some parts of the world it is recognized that he 

legitimately may; therefore the interests of the wife, anxious to retain 

her husband's fidelity, and the interests of Christian morality, anxious 

to uphold the institution of monogamy, combine to permit the continuation 

of coitus during pregnancy. The custom has been furthered by the fact 

that, in civilized women at all events, coitus during pregnancy is usually 

not less agreeable than at other times and by some women is felt indeed to 

be even more agreeable.[13] There is also the further consideration, for 

those couples who have sought to prevent conception, that now intercourse 

may be enjoyed with impunity. From a higher point of view such intercourse 

may also be justified, for if, as all the finer moralists of the sexual 

impulse now believe, love has its value not only in so far as it induces 

procreation but also in so far as it aids individual development and the 

mutual good and harmony of the united couple, it becomes morally right 

during pregnancy. 

 

From an early period, however, great authorities have declared themselves 

in opposition to the custom of practicing coitus during pregnancy. At the 

end of the first century, Soranus, the first of great gynaecologists, 

stated, in his treatise on the diseases of women, that sexual intercourse 

is injurious throughout pregnancy, because of the movement imparted to the 

uterus, and especially injurious during the latter months. For more than 

sixteen hundred years the question, having fallen into the hands of the 

theologians, seems to have been neglected on the medical side until in 

1721 a distinguished French obstetrician, Mauriceau, stated that no 

pregnant woman should have intercourse during the last two months and that 

no woman subject to miscarriage should have intercourse at all during 

pregnancy. For more than a century, however, Mauriceau remained a pioneer 

with few or no followers. It would be inconvenient, the opinion went, even 


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