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Table of contents
PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

leave the patient himself to decide. 

 

There is another reason why, having regard to the prevailing moral 

opinions at all events among the middle classes, a physician should 

refrain from advising extra-conjugal intercourse: he places himself in a 

false relation to his social environment. He is recommending a remedy the 

nature of which he could not publicly avow, and so destroying the public 

confidence in himself. The only physician who is morally entitled to 

advise his patients to enter into extra-conjugal relationships is one who 

openly acknowledges that he is prepared to give such advice. The doctor 

who is openly working for social reform has perhaps won the moral right to 

give advice in accordance with the tendency of his public activity, but 

even then his advice may be very dubiously judicious, and he would be 

better advised to confine his efforts at social reform to his public 

activities. The voice of the physician, as Professor Max Flesch of 

Frankfort observes, is more and more heard in the development and new 

growth of social institutions; he is a natural leaders in such movements, 

and proposals for reform properly come from him. "But," as Flesch 

continues, "publicly to accept the excellence of existing institutions and 

in the privacy of the consulting-room to give advice which assumes the 

imperfection of those institutions is illogical and confusing. It is the 

physician's business to give advice which is in accordance with the 

interests of the community as a whole, and those interests require that 

sexual relationships should be entered into between healthy men and women 

who are able and willing to accept the results of their union. That should 

be the physician's rule of conduct. Only so can he become, what to-day he 

is often proclaimed to be, the leader of the nation."[98] This view is 

not, as we see, entirely in accord with that which assumes that the 

physician's duty is solely and entirely to his patient, without regard to 

the bearing of his advice on social conduct. The patient's interests are 

primary, but they are not entitled to be placed in antagonism to the 

interests of society. The advice given by the wise physician must always 

be in harmony with the social and moral tone of his age. Thus it is that 

the tendency among the younger generation of physicians to-day to take an 

active interest in raising that tone and in promoting social reform--a 

tendency which exists not only in Germany where such interests have long 

been acute, but also in so conservative a land as England--is full of 

promise for the future. 

 

The physician is usually content to consider his duty to his patient in 

relationship to sexual abstinence as sufficiently fulfilled when he 

attempts to allay sexual hyperaesthesia by medical or hygienic treatment. 

It can scarcely be claimed, however, that the results of such treatment 

are usually satisfactory, and sometimes indeed the treatment has a result 

which is the reverse of that intended. The difficulty generally is that in 

order to be efficacious the treatment must be carried to an extreme which 

exhausts or inhibits not only the genital activities alone but the 

activities of the whole organism, and short of that it may prove a 

stimulant rather than a sedative. It is difficult and usually impossible 

to separate out a man's sexual activities and bring influence to bear on 

these activities alone. Sexual activity is so closely intertwined with the 

other organic activities, erotic exuberance is so much a flower which is 

rooted in the whole organism, that the blow which crushes it may strike 

down the whole man. The bromides are universally recognized as powerful 


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