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Table of contents
PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

abstinence" we ought only to agree to do so under protest. 

 

If we thus decide to approach it, and if we have reached the 

conviction--which, in view of all the evidence we can scarcely 

escape--that, while sexual abstinence in so far as it may be recognized as 

possible is not incompatible with health, there are yet many adults for 

whom it is harmful, and a very much larger number for whom when prolonged 

it is undesirable, we encounter a serious problem. It is a problem which 

confronts any person, and especially the physician, who may be called upon 

to give professional advice to his fellows on this matter. If sexual 

relationships are sometimes desirable for unmarried persons, or for 

married persons who, for any reason, are debarred from conjugal union, is 

a physician justified in recommending such sexual relationships to his 

patient? This is a question that has frequently been debated and decided 

in opposing senses. 

 

Various distinguished physicians, especially in Germany, have 

proclaimed the duty of the doctor to recommend sexual intercourse 

to his patient whenever he considers it desirable. Gyurkovechky, 

for instance, has fully discussed this question, and answered it 

in the affirmative. Nystroem (_Sexual-Probleme_, July, 1908, p. 

413) states that it is the physician's duty, in some cases of 

sexual weakness, when all other methods of treatment have failed, 

to recommend sexual intercourse as the best remedy. Dr. Max 

Marcuse stands out as a conspicuous advocate of the unconditional 

duty of the physician to advocate sexual intercourse in some 

cases, both to men and to women, and has on many occasions argued 

in this sense (e.g., _Darf der Arzt zum Ausserehelichen 

Geschlechtsverkehr raten?_ 1904). Marcuse is strongly of opinion 

that a physician who, allowing himself to be influenced by moral, 

sociological, or other considerations, neglects to recommend 

sexual intercourse when he considers it desirable for the 

patient's health, is unworthy of his profession, and should 

either give up medicine or send his patients to other doctors. 

This attitude, though not usually so emphatically stated, seems 

to be widely accepted. Lederer goes even further when he states 

(_Monatsschrift fuer Harnkrankheiten und Sexuelle Hygiene_, 1906, 

Heft 3) that it is the physician's duty in the case of a woman 

who is suffering from her husband's impotence, to advise her to 

have intercourse with another man, adding that "whether she does 

so with her husband's consent is no affair of the physician's, 

for he is not the guardian of morality, but the guardian of 

health." The physicians who publicly take this attitude are, 

however, a small minority. In England, so far as I am aware, no 

physician of eminence has openly proclaimed the duty of the 

doctor to advise sexual intercourse outside marriage, although, 

it is scarcely necessary to add, in England, as elsewhere, it 

happens that doctors, including women doctors, from time to time 

privately point out to their unmarried and even married patients, 

that sexual intercourse would probably be beneficial. 

 

 

The duty of the physician to recommend sexual intercourse has 

been denied as emphatically as it has been affirmed. Thus 

Eulenburg (_Sexuale Neuropathie_, p. 43), would by no means 

advise extra-conjugal relations to his patient; "such advice is 

quite outside the physician's competence." It is, of course, 

denied by those who regard sexual abstinence as always harmless, 


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