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Table of contents
PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

differences of conviction would be reduced within very narrow and trifling 

limits. 

 

We cannot strictly coordinate the impulse of reproduction with the impulse 

of nutrition. There are very important differences between them, more 

especially the fundamental difference that while the satisfaction of the 

one impulse is absolutely necessary both to the life of the individual and 

of the race, the satisfaction of the other is absolutely necessary only to 

the life of the race. But when we reduce this question to one of "sexual 

abstinence" we are obviously placing it on the same basis as that of 

abstinence from food, that is to say at the very opposite pole to which we 

place it when (as in the previous chapter) we consider it from the point 

of view of asceticism and chastity. It thus comes about that on this 

negative basis there really is an interesting analogy between nutritive 

abstinence, though necessarily only maintained incompletely and for a 

short time, and sexual abstinence, maintained more completely and for a 

longer time. A patient of Janet's seems to bring out clearly this 

resemblance. Nadia, whom Janet was able to study during five years, was a 

young woman of twenty-seven, healthy and intelligent, not suffering from 

hysteria nor from anorexia, for she had a normal appetite. But she had an 

idea; she was anxious to be slim and to attain this end she cut down her 

meals to the smallest size, merely a little soup and a few eggs. She 

suffered much from the abstinence she thus imposed on herself, and was 

always hungry, though sometimes her hunger was masked by the inevitable 

stomach trouble caused by so long a persistence in this _regime_. At 

times, indeed, she had been so hungry that she had devoured greedily 

whatever she could lay her hands on, and not infrequently she could not 

resist the temptation to eat a few biscuits in secret. Such actions caused 

her horrible remorse, but, all the same, she would be guilty of them 

again. She realized the great efforts demanded by her way of life, and 

indeed looked upon herself as a heroine for resisting so long. 

"Sometimes," she told Janet, "I passed whole hours in thinking about food, 

I was so hungry. I swallowed my saliva, I bit my handkerchief, I rolled 

on the ground, I wanted to eat so badly. I searched books for descriptions 

of meals and feasts, I tried to deceive my hunger by imagining that I too 

was enjoying all these good things. I was really famished, and in spite of 

a few weaknesses for biscuits I know that I showed much courage."[96] 

Nadia's motive idea, that she wished to be slim, corresponds to the 

abstinent man's idea that he wishes to be "moral," and only differs from 

it by having the advantage of being somewhat more positive and personal, 

for the idea of the person who wishes to avoid sexual indulgence because 

it is "not right" is often not merely negative but impersonal and imposed 

by the social and religious environment. Nadia's occasional outbursts of 

reckless greediness correspond to the sudden impulses to resort to 

prostitution, and her secret weaknesses for biscuits, followed by keen 

remorse, to lapses into the habit of masturbation. Her fits of struggling 

and rolling on the ground are precisely like the outbursts of futile 

desire which occasionally occur to young abstinent men and women in health 

and strength. The absorption in thoughts about meals and in literary 

descriptions of meals is clearly analogous to the abstinent man's 

absorption in wanton thoughts and erotic books. Finally, Nadia's 

conviction that she is a heroine corresponds exactly to the attitude of 


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