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Table of contents
PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

the writers regard as moral considerations. Moreover, as the same 

writers are usually equally emphatic in regard to the advantages 

of sexual intercourse in marriage, it is clear that they have 

committed themselves to a contradiction. The same act, as Naecke 

rightly points out, cannot become good or bad according as it is 

performed in or out of marriage. There is no magic efficacy in a 

few words pronounced by a priest or a government official. 

 

Remondino (loc. cit.) remarks that the authorities who have 

committed themselves to declarations in favor of the 

unconditional advantages of sexual abstinence tend to fall into 

three errors: (1) they generalize unduly, instead of considering 

each case individually, on its own merits; (2) they fail to 

realize that human nature is influenced by highly mixed and 

complex motives and cannot be assumed to be amenable only to 

motives of abstract morality; (3) they ignore the great army of 

masturbators and sexual perverts who make no complaint of sexual 

suffering, but by maintaining a rigid sexual abstinence, so far 

as normal relationships are concerned, gradually drift into 

currents whence there is no return. 

 

Between those who unconditionally affirm or deny the harmlessness of 

sexual abstinence we find an intermediate party of authorities whose 

opinions are more qualified. Many of those who occupy this more guarded 

position are men whose opinions carry much weight, and it is probable that 

with them rather than with the more extreme advocates on either side the 

greater measure of reason lies. So complex a question as this cannot be 

adequately investigated merely in the abstract, and settled by an 

unqualified negative or affirmative. It is a matter in which every case 

requires its own special and personal consideration. 

 

"Where there is such a marked opposition of opinion truth is not 

exclusively on one side," remarks Loewenfeld (_Sexualleben und 

Nervenleiden_, second edition, p. 40). Sexual abstinence is 

certainly often injurious to neuropathic persons. (This is now 

believed by a large number of authorities, and was perhaps first 

decisively stated by Krafft-Ebing, "Ueber Neurosen durch 

Abstinenz," _Jahrbuch fuer Psychiatrie_, 1889, p. 1). Loewenfeld 

finds no special proclivity to neurasthenia among the Catholic 

clergy, and when it does occur, there is no reason to suppose a 

sexual causation. "In healthy and not hereditarily neuropathic 

men complete abstinence is possible without injury to the nervous 

system." Injurious effects, he continues, when they appear, 

seldom occur until between twenty-four and thirty-six years of 

age, and even then are not usually serious enough to lead to a 

visit to a doctor, consisting mainly in frequency of nocturnal 

emissions, pain in testes or rectum, hyperaesthesia in the 

presence of women or of sexual ideas. If, however, conditions 

arise which specially stimulate the sexual emotions, neurasthenia 

may be produced. Loewenfeld agrees with Freud and Gattel that the 

neurosis of anxiety tends to occur in the abstinent, careful 

examination showing that the abstinence is a factor in its 

production in both sexes. It is common among young women married 

to much older men, often appearing during the first years of 

marriage. Under special circumstances, therefore, abstinence can 

be injurious, but on the whole the difficulties due to such 

abstinence are not severe, and they only exceptionally call forth 


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