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Table of contents
PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

sad spectacle of a _vie manquee_ without ever knowing the true 

source of the misery which incapacitates them for all the active 

duties of life. It is a singular fact that in occasional 

instances one may even see two sisters, inheriting the same kind 

of nervous organization, both tormented with the symptoms of 

spinal irritation and both probably suffering from repressed 

sexual functions, but of whom one shall be pure-minded and 

entirely unconscious of the real source of her troubles, while 

the other is a victim to conscious and fruitless sexual 

irritation." In this matter Anstie may be regarded as a 

forerunner of Freud, who has developed with great subtlety and 

analytic power the doctrine of the transformation of repressed 

sexual instinct in women into morbid forms. He considers that the 

nervosity of to-day is largely due to the injurious action on the 

sexual life of that repression of natural instincts on which our 

civilization is built up. (Perhaps the clearest brief statement 

of Freud's views on the matter is to be found in a very 

suggestive article, "Die 'Kulturelle' Sexualmoral und die Moderne 

Nervositaet," in _Sexual-Probleme_, March, 1908, reprinted in the 

second series of Freud's _Sammlung Kleiner Schriften zur 

Neurosenlehre_, 1909). We possess the aptitude, he says, of 

sublimating and transforming our sexual activities into other 

activities of a psychically related character, but non-sexual. 

This process cannot, however, be carried out to an unlimited 

extent any more than can the conversion of heat into mechanical 

work in our machines. A certain amount of direct sexual 

satisfaction is for most organizations indispensable, and the 

renunciation of this individually varying amount is punished by 

manifestations which we are compelled to regard as morbid. The 

process of sublimation, under the influence of civilization, 

leads both to sexual perversions and to psycho-neuroses. These 

two conditions are closely related, as Freud views the process of 

their development; they stand to each other as positive and 

negative, sexual perversions being the positive pole and 

psycho-neuroses the negative. It often happens, he remarks, that 

a brother may be sexually perverse, while his sister, with a 

weaker sexual temperament, is a neurotic whose symptoms are a 

transformation of her brother's perversion; while in many 

families the men are immoral, the women pure and refined but 

highly nervous. In the case of women who have no defect of sexual 

impulse there is yet the same pressure of civilized morality 

pushing them into neurotic states. It is a terribly serious 

injustice, Freud remarks, that the civilized standard of sexual 

life is the same for all persons, because though some, by their 

organization, may easily accept it, for others it involves the 

most difficult psychic sacrifices. The unmarried girl, who has 

become nervously weak, cannot be advised to seek relief in 

marriage, for she must be strong in order to "bear" marriage, 

while we urge a man on no account to marry a girl who is not 

strong. The married woman who has experienced the deceptions of 

marriage has usually no way of relief left but by abandoning her 

virtue. "The more strenuously she has been educated, and the more 

completely she has been subjected to the demands of civilization, 

the more she fears this way of escape, and in the conflict 

between her desires and her sense of duty, she also seeks 


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