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Table of contents
PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

abstinence are more marked in women. Sir Benjamin Brodie said 

long ago that the evils of continence to women are perhaps 

greater than those of incontinence, and to-day Hammer (_Die 

Gesundheitlichen Gefahren der Geschlechtlichen Enthaltsamkeit_, 

1904) states that, so far as reasons of health are concerned, 

sexual abstinence is no more to be recommended to women than to 

men. Nystroem is of the same opinion, though he thinks that women 

bear sexual abstinence better than men, and has discussed this 

special question at length in a section of his _Geschlechtsleben 

und seine Gesetze_. He agrees with the experienced Erb that a 

large number of completely chaste women of high character, and 

possessing distinguished qualities of mind and heart, are more or 

less disordered through their sexual abstinence; this is 

specially often the case with women married to impotent men, 

though it is frequently not until they approach the age of 

thirty, Nystroem remarks, that women definitely realize their 

sexual needs. 

 

A great many women who are healthy, chaste, and modest, feel at 

times such powerful sexual desire that they can scarcely resist 

the temptation to go into the street and solicit the first man 

they meet. Not a few such women, often of good breeding, do 

actually offer themselves to men with whom they may have perhaps 

only the slightest acquaintance. Routh records such cases 

(_British Gynaecological Journal_, Feb., 1887), and most men have 

met with them at some time. When a woman of high moral character 

and strong passions is subjected for a very long period to the 

perpetual strain of such sexual craving, especially if combined 

with love for a definite individual, a chain of evil results, 

physical and moral, may be set up, and numerous distinguished 

physicians have recorded such cases, which terminated at once in 

complete recovery as soon as the passion was gratified. Lauvergne 

long since described a case. A fairly typical case of this kind 

was reported in detail by Brachet (_De l'Hypochondrie_, p. 69) 

and embodied by Griesinger in his classic work on "Mental 

Pathology." It concerned a healthy married lady, twenty-six years 

old, having three children. A visiting acquaintance completely 

gained her affections, but she strenuously resisted the seducing 

influence, and concealed the violent passion that he had aroused 

in her. Various serious symptoms, physical and mental, slowly 

began to appear, and she developed what seemed to be signs of 

consumption. Six months' stay in the south of France produced no 

improvement, either in the bodily or mental symptoms. On 

returning home she became still worse. Then she again met the 

object of her passion, succumbed, abandoned her husband and 

children, and fled with him. Six months later she was scarcely 

recognizable; beauty, freshness and plumpness had taken the place 

of emaciation; while the symptoms of consumption and all other 

troubles had entirely disappeared. A somewhat similar case is 

recorded by Camill Lederer, of Vienna (_Monatsschrift fuer 

Harnkrankheiten und Sexuelle Hygiene_, 1906, Heft 3). A widow, a 

few months after her husband's death, began to cough, with 

symptoms of bronchial catarrh, but no definite signs of lung 

disease. Treatment and change of climate proved entirely 

unavailing to effect a cure. Two years later, as no signs of 

disease had appeared in the lungs, though the symptoms continued, 


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