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Table of contents
PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

inconceivably vast amount of work, we shall probably conclude that sexual 

indulgence had a very much smaller part in Goethe's life than in that of 

many an average man on whom it leaves no obvious emotional or intellectual 

trace whatever. Sterne, again, declared that he must always have a 

Dulcinea dancing in his head, yet the amount of his intimate relations 

with women appears to have been small. Balzac spent his life toiling at 

his desk and carrying on during many years a love correspondence with a 

woman he scarcely ever saw and at the end only spent a few months of 

married life with. The like experience has befallen many artistic 

creators. For, in the words of Landor, "absence is the invisible and 

incorporeal mother of ideal beauty." 

 

We do well to remember that, while the auto-erotic manifestations through 

the brain are of infinite variety and importance, the brain and the 

sexual organs are yet the great rivals in using up bodily energy, and that 

there is an antagonism between extreme brain vigor and extreme sexual 

vigor, even although they may sometimes both appear at different periods 

in the same individual.[90] In this sense there is no paradox in the 

saying of Ramon Correa that potency is impotence and impotence potency, 

for a high degree of energy, whether in athletics or in intellect or in 

sexual activity, is unfavorable to the display of energy in other 

directions. Every high degree of potency has its related impotencies. 

 

It may be added that we may find a curiously inconsistent proof 

of the excessive importance attached to sexual function by a 

society which systematically tries to depreciate sex, in the 

disgrace which is attributed to the lack of "virile" potency. 

Although civilized life offers immense scope for the activities 

of sexually impotent persons, the impotent man is made to feel 

that, while he need not be greatly concerned if he suffers from 

nervous disturbances of digestion, if he should suffer just as 

innocently from nervous disturbances of the sexual impulse, it is 

almost a crime. A striking example of this was shown, a few years 

ago, when it was plausibly suggested that Carlyle's relations 

with his wife might best be explained by supposing that he 

suffered from some trouble of sexual potency. At once admirers 

rushed forward to "defend" Carlyle from this "disgraceful" 

charge; they were more shocked than if it had been alleged that 

he was a syphilitic. Yet impotence is, at the most, an infirmity, 

whether due to some congenital anatomical defect or to a 

disturbance of nervous balance in the delicate sexual mechanism, 

such as is apt to occur in men of abnormally sensitive 

temperament. It is no more disgraceful to suffer from it than 

from dyspepsia, with which, indeed, it may be associated. Many 

men of genius and high moral character have been sexually 

deformed. This was the case with Cowper (though this significant 

fact is suppressed by his biographers); Ruskin was divorced for a 

reason of this kind; and J.S. Mill, it is said, was sexually of 

little more than infantile development. 


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