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Table of contents
PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

perfection of security, liberty, and abundance our civilization 

has attained, the normal untrained human being is disposed to 

excess in almost every direction; he tends to eat too much and 

too elaborately, to drink too much, to become lazy faster than 

his work can be reduced, to waste his interest upon displays, and 

to make love too much and too elaborately. He gets out of 

training, and concentrates upon egoistic or erotic broodings. Our 

founders organized motives from all sorts of sources, but I think 

the chief force to give men self-control is pride. Pride may not 

be the noblest thing in the soul, but it is the best king there, 

for all that. They looked to it to keep a man clean and sound and 

sane. In this matter, as in all matters of natural desire, they 

held no appetite must be glutted, no appetite must have 

artificial whets, and also and equally that no appetite should be 

starved. A man must come from the table satisfied, but not 

replete. And, in the matter of love, a straight and clean desire 

for a clean and straight fellow-creature was our founders' ideal. 

They enjoined marriage between equals as the duty to the race, 

and they framed directions of the precisest sort to prevent that 

uxorious inseparableness, that connubiality, that sometimes 

reduces a couple of people to something jointly less than 

either." 

 

With regard to chastity as an element of erotic satisfaction, 

Edward Carpenter writes (_Love's Coming of Age_, p. 11): "There 

is a kind of illusion about physical desire similar to that which 

a child suffers from when, seeing a beautiful flower, it 

instantly snatches the same, and destroys in a few moments the 

form and fragrance which attracted it. He only gets the full 

glory who holds himself back a little, and truly possesses, who 

is willing, if need be, not to possess. He is indeed a master of 

life who, accepting the grosser desires as they come to his body, 

and not refusing them, knows how to transform them at will into 

the most rare and fragrant flowers of human emotion." 

 

Beyond its functions in building up character, in heightening and 

ennobling the erotic life, and in subserving the adequate fulfilment of 

family and social duties, chastity has a more special value for those who 

cultivate the arts. We may not always be inclined to believe the writers 

who have declared that their verse alone is wanton, but their lives 

chaste. It is certainly true, however, that a relationship of this kind 

tends to occur. The stuff of the sexual life, as Nietzsche says, is the 

stuff of art; if it is expended in one channel it is lost for the other. 

The masters of all the more intensely emotional arts have frequently 

cultivated a high degree of chastity. This is notably the case as regards 

music; one thinks of Mozart,[89] of Beethoven, of Schubert, and many 

lesser men. In the case of poets and novelists chastity may usually seem 

to be less prevalent but it is frequently well-marked, and is not seldom 

disguised by the resounding reverberations which even the slightest 

love-episode often exerts on the poetic organism. Goethe's life seems, at 

a first glance, to be a long series of continuous love-episodes. Yet when 

we remember that it was the very long life of a man whose vigor remained 

until the end, that his attachments long and profoundly affected his 

emotional life and his work, and that with most of the women he has 

immortalized he never had actual sexual relationships at all, and when we 

realize, moreover, that, throughout, he accomplished an almost 


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