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Table of contents
PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

the final climax of gratified love is not the trivial detumescence of a 

petty desire but the immense consummation of a longing in which the whole 

soul as well as the whole body has its part. "Only the chaste can be 

really obscene," said Huysmans. And on a higher plane, only the chaste can 

really love. 

 

"Physical purity," remarks Hans Menjago ("Die Ueberschaetzung der 

Physischen Reinheit," _Geschlecht und Gesellschaft_, vol. ii, 

Part VIII) "was originally valued as a sign of greater strength 

of will and firmness of character, and it marked a rise above 

primitive conditions. This purity was difficult to preserve in 

those unsure days; it was rare and unusual. From this rarity rose 

the superstition of supernatural power residing in the virgin. 

But this has no meaning as soon as such purity becomes general 

and a specially conspicuous degree of firmness of character is no 

longer needed to maintain it.... Physical purity can only possess 

value when it is the result of individual strength of character, 

and not when it is the result of compulsory rules of morality." 

 

Konrad Hoeller, who has given special attention to the sexual 

question in schools, remarks in relation to physical exercise: 

"The greatest advantage of physical exercises, however, is not 

the development of the active and passive strength of the body 

and its skill, but the establishment and fortification of the 

authority of the will over the body and its needs, so much given 

up to indolence. He who has learnt to endure and overcome, for 

the sake of a definite aim, hunger and thirst and fatigue, will 

be the better able to withstand sexual impulses and the 

temptation to gratify them, when better insight and aesthetic 

feeling have made clear to him, as one used to maintain authority 

over his body, that to yield would be injurious or disgraceful" 

(K. Hoeller, "Die Aufgabe der Volksschule," _Sexualpaedagogik_, p. 

70). Professor Schaefenacker (id., p. 102), who also emphasizes 

the importance of self-control and self-restraint, thinks a youth 

must bear in mind his future mission, as citizen and father of a 

family. 

 

A subtle and penetrative thinker of to-day, Jules de Gaultier, 

writing on morals without reference to this specific question, 

has discussed what new internal inhibitory motives we can appeal 

to in replacing the old external inhibition of authority and 

belief which is now decayed. He answers that the state of feeling 

on which old faiths were based still persists. "May not," he 

asks, "the desire for a thing that we love and wish for 

beneficently replace the belief that a thing is by divine will, 

or in the nature of things? Will not the presence of a bridle on 

the frenzy of instinct reveal itself as a useful attitude adopted 

by instinct itself for its own conservation, as a symptom of the 

force and health of instinct? Is not empire over oneself, the 

power of regulating one's acts, a mark of superiority and a 

motive for self-esteem? Will not this joy of pride have the same 

authority in preserving the instincts as was once possessed by 

religious fear and the pretended imperatives of reason?" (Jules 

de Gaultier, _La Dependance de la Morale et l'Independance des 

Moeurs_, p. 153.) 

 

H.G. Wells (in _A Modern Utopia_), pointing out the importance of 

chastity, though rejecting celibacy, invokes, like Jules de 

Gaultier, the motive of pride. "Civilization has developed far 

more rapidly than man has modified. Under the unnatural 


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