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Table of contents
PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

and social position. This is necessary not only in the interests 

of humanity and public economy, but also, as is too often 

forgotten, in the interests of morality, for it is certain that 

by the neglect to furnish adequate provision of this nature women 

are driven to infanticide and prostitution. In earlier, more 

humane days, the general provision for the secret reception and 

care of illegitimate infants was undoubtedly most beneficial. The 

suppression of the mediaeval method, which in France took place 

gradually between 1833 and 1862, led to a great increase in 

infanticide and abortion, and was a direct encouragement to crime 

and immorality. In 1887 the Conseil General of the Seine sought 

to replace the prevailing neglect of this matter by the adoption 

of more enlightened ideas and founded a _bureau secret 

d'admission_ for pregnant women. Since then both the abandonment 

of infants and infanticide have greatly diminished, though they 

are increasing in those parts of France which possess no 

facilities of this kind. It is widely held that the State should 

unify the arrangements for assuring secret maternity, and should, 

in its own interests, undertake the expense. In 1904 French law 

ensured the protection of unmarried mothers by guaranteeing their 

secret, but it failed to organize the general establishment of 

secret maternities, and has left to doctors the pioneering part 

in this great and humane public work (A. Maillard-Brune, 

_Refuges, Maternites, Bureaux d'Admission Secrets, comme Moyens 

Preservatives des Infanticide_, These de Paris, 1908). It is not 

among the least benefits of the falling birth rate that it has 

helped to stimulate this beneficent movement. 

 

The development of an industrial system which subordinates the human body 

and the human soul to the thirst for gold, has, for a time, dismissed from 

social consideration the interests of the race and even of the individual, 

but it must be remembered that this has not been always and everywhere so. 

Although in some parts of the world the women of savage peoples work up to 

the time of confinement, it must be remarked that the conditions of work 

in savage life do not resemble the strenuous and continuous labor of 

modern factories. In many parts of the world, however, women are not 

allowed to work hard during pregnancy and every consideration is shown to 

them. This is so, for instance, among the Pueblo Indians, and among the 

Indians of Mexico. Similar care is taken in the Carolines and the Gilbert 

Islands and in many other regions all over the world. In some places, 

women are secluded during pregnancy, and in others are compelled to 

observe many more or less excellent rules. It is true that the assigned 

cause for these rules is frequently the fear of evil spirits, but they 

nevertheless often preserve a hygienic value. In many parts of the world 

the discovery of pregnancy is the sign for a festival of more or less 

ritual character, and much good advice is given to the expectant mother. 

The modern Musselmans are careful to guard the health of their women when 

pregnant, and so are the Chinese.[6] Even in Europe, in the thirteenth 

century, as Clappier notes, industrial corporations sometimes had regard 

to this matter, and would not allow women to work during pregnancy. In 

Iceland, where much of the primitive life of Scandinavian Europe is still 

preserved, great precautions are taken with pregnant women. They must lead 

a quiet life, avoid tight garments, be moderate in eating and drinking, 

take no alcohol, be safeguarded from all shocks, while their husbands and 


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