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Table of contents
PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

should include the early as the late months of pregnancy." 

 

In England little progress has yet been made as regards this 

question of rest during pregnancy, even as regards the education 

of public opinion. Sir William Sinclair, Professor of Obstetrics 

at the Victoria University of Manchester, has published (1907) _A 

Plea for Establishing Municipal Maternity Homes_. Ballantyne, a 

great British authority on the embryology of the child, has 

published a "Plea for a Pre-Maternity Hospital" (_British Medical 

Journal_, April 6, 1901), has since given an important lecture on 

the subject (_British Medical Journal_, Jan. 11, 1908), and has 

further discussed the matter in his _Manual of Ante-Natal 

Pathology: The Foetus_ (Ch. XXVII); he is, however, more 

interested in the establishment of hospitals for the diseases of 

pregnancy than in the wider and more fundamental question of rest 

for all pregnant women. In England there are, indeed, a few 

institutions which receive unmarried women, with a record of good 

conduct, who are pregnant for the first time, for, as 

Bouchacourt remarks, ancient British prejudices are opposed to 

any mercy being shown to women who are recidivists in committing 

the crime of conception. 

 

At present, indeed, it is only in France that the urgent need of 

rest during the latter months of pregnancy has been clearly 

realized, and any serious and official attempts made to provide 

for it. In an interesting Paris thesis (_De la Puericulture avant 

le Naissance_, 1907) Clappier has brought together much 

information bearing on the efforts now being made to deal 

practically with this question. There are many _Asiles_ in Paris 

for pregnant women. One of the best is the Asile Michelet, 

founded in 1893 by the Assistance Publique de Paris. This is a 

sanatorium for pregnant women who have reached a period of seven 

and a half months. It is nominally restricted to the admission of 

French women who have been domiciled for a year in Paris, but, in 

practice, it appears that women from all parts of France are 

received. They are employed in light and occasional work for the 

institution, being paid for this work, and are also occupied in 

making clothes for the expected baby. Married and unmarried women 

are admitted alike, all women being equal from the point of view 

of motherhood, and indeed the majority of the women who come to 

the Asile Michelet are unmarried, some being girls who have even 

trudged on foot from Brittany and other remote parts of France, 

to seek concealment from their friends in the hospitable 

seclusion of these refuges in the great city. It is not the least 

advantage of these institutions that they shield unmarried 

mothers and their offspring from the manifold evils to which they 

are exposed, and thus tend to decrease crime and suffering. In 

addition to the maternity refuges, there are institutions in 

France for assisting with help and advice those pregnant women 

who prefer to remain at home, but are thus enabled to avoid the 

necessity for undue domestic labor. 

 

There ought to be no manner of doubt that when, as is the case 

to-day in our own and some other supposedly civilized countries, 

motherhood outside marriage is accounted as almost a crime, there 

is the very greatest need for adequate provision for unmarried 

women who are about to become mothers, enabling them to receive 

shelter and care in secrecy, and to preserve their self-respect 


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