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Table of contents
PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

 

Rest during pregnancy is a very powerful agent in preventing 

premature birth. Thus Dr. Sarraute-Lourie has compared 1,550 

pregnant women at the Asile Michelet who rested before 

confinement with 1,550 women confined at the Hopital Lariboisiere 

who had enjoyed no such period of rest. She found that the 

average duration of pregnancy was at least twenty days shorter in 

the latter group (Mme. Sarraute-Lourie, _De l'Influence du Repos 

sur la Duree de la Gestation_, These de Paris, 1899). 

 

Leyboff has insisted on the absolute necessity of rest during 

pregnancy, as well for the sake of the woman herself as the 

burden she carries, and shows the evil results which follow when 

rest is neglected. Railway traveling, horse-riding, bicycling, 

and sea-voyages are also, Leyboff believes, liable to be 

injurious to the course of pregnancy. Leyboff recognizes the 

difficulties which procreating women are placed under by present 

industrial conditions, and concludes that "it is urgently 

necessary to prevent women, by law, from working during the last 

three months of pregnancy; that in every district there should be 

a maternity fund; that during this enforced rest a woman should 

receive the same salary as during work." He adds that the 

children of unmarried mothers should be cared for by the State, 

that there should be an eight-hours' day for all workers, and 

that no children under sixteen should be allowed to work (E. 

Leyboff, _L'Hygiene de la Grossesse_, These de Paris, 1905). 

 

Perruc states that at least two months' rest before confinement 

should be made compulsory, and that during this period the woman 

should receive an indemnity regulated by the State. He is of 

opinion that it should take the form of compulsory assurance, to 

which the worker, the employer, and the State alike contributed 

(Perruc, _Assistance aux Femmes Enceintes_, These de Paris, 

1905). 

 

It is probable that during the earlier months of pregnancy, work, 

if not excessively heavy and exhausting, has little or no bad 

effect; thus Bacchimont (_Documents pour servir a l'Histoire de 

la Puericulture Intra-uterine_, These de Paris, 1898) found that, 

while there was a great gain in the weight of children of mothers 

who had rested for three months, there was no corresponding gain 

in the children of those mothers who had rested for longer 

periods. It is during the last three months that freedom, repose, 

the cessation of the obligatory routine of employment become 

necessary. This is the opinion of Pinard, the chief authority on 

this matter. Many, however, fearing that economic and industrial 

conditions render so long a period of rest too difficult of 

practical attainment, are, with Clappier and G. Newman, content 

to demand two months as a minimum; Salvat only asks for one 

month's rest before confinement, the woman, whether married or 

not, receiving a pecuniary indemnity during this period, with 

medical care and drugs free. Ballantyne (_Manual of Antenatal 

Pathology: The Foetus_, p. 475), as well as Niven, also asks only 

for one month's compulsory rest during pregnancy, with indemnity. 

Arthur Helme, however, taking a more comprehensive view of all 

the factors involved, concludes in a valuable paper on "The 

Unborn Child: Its Care and Its Rights" (_British Medical 

Journal_, Aug. 24, 1907), "The important thing would be to 

prohibit pregnant women from going to work at all, and it is as 

important from the standpoint of the child that this prohibition 


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