Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

extent dispense with, although even she, as we see, suffers in 

the person of her child, and probably in her own person, from the 

effects of work during pregnancy. The serious nature of this 

civilized tendency to premature birth--of which lack of rest in 

pregnancy is, however, only one of several important causes--is 

shown by the fact that Seropian (_Frequence Comparee des Causes 

de l'Accouchement Premature_, These de Paris, 1907) found that 

about one-third of French births (32.28 per cent.) are to a 

greater or less extent premature. Pregnancy is not a morbid 

condition; on the contrary, a pregnant woman is at the climax of 

her most normal physiological life, but owing to the tension thus 

involved she is specially liable to suffer from any slight shock 

or strain. 

 

It must be remarked that the increased tendency to premature 

birth, while in part it may be due to general tendencies of 

civilization, is also in part due to very definite and 

preventable causes. Syphilis, alcoholism, and attempts to produce 

abortion are among the not uncommon causes of premature birth 

(see, e.g., G.F. McCleary, "The Influence of Antenatal Conditions 

on Infantile Mortality," _British Medical Journal_, Aug. 13, 

1904). 

 

Premature birth ought to be avoided, because the child born too 

early is insufficiently equipped for the task before him. 

Astengo, dealing with nearly 19,000 cases at the Lariboisiere 

Hospital in Paris and the Maternite, found, that reckoning from 

the date of the last menstruation, there is a direct relation 

between the weight of the infant at birth and the length of the 

pregnancy. The longer the pregnancy, the finer the child 

(Astengo, _Rapport du Poids des Enfants a la Duree de la 

Grossesse_, These de Paris, 1905). 

 

The frequency of premature birth is probably as great in England 

as in France. Ballantyne states (_Manual of Antenatal Pathology; 

The Foetus_, p. 456) that for practical purposes the frequency 

of premature labors in maternity hospitals may be put at 20 per 

cent., but that if all infants weighing less than 3,000 grammes 

are to be regarded as premature, it rises to 41.5 per cent. That 

premature birth is increasing in England seems to be indicated by 

the fact that during the past twenty-five years there has been a 

steady rise in the mortality rate from premature birth. McCleary, 

who discusses this point and considers the increase real, 

concludes that "it would appear that there has been a diminution 

in the quality as well as in the quantity of our output of 

babies" (see also a discussion, introduced by Dawson Williams, on 

"Physical Deterioration," _British Medical Journal_, Oct. 14, 

1905). 

 

It need scarcely be pointed out that not only is immaturity a 

cause of deterioration in the infants that survive, but that it 

alone serves enormously to decrease the number of infants that 

are able to survive. Thus G. Newman states (loc. cit.) that in 

most large English urban districts immaturity is the chief cause 

of infant mortality, furnishing about 30 per cent. of the infant 

deaths; even in London (Islington) Alfred Harris (_British 

Medical Journal_, Dec. 14, 1907) finds that it is responsible for 

nearly 17 per cent. of the infantile deaths. It is estimated by 

Newman that about half of the mothers of infants dying of 

immaturity suffer from marked ill-health and poor physique; they 

are not, therefore, fitted to be mothers. 


Page 2 from 6:  Back   1  [2]  3   4   5   6   Forward