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Table of contents
PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

Letourneux has studied the question whether repose during 

pregnancy is necessary for women whose professional work is only 

slightly fatiguing. He investigated 732 successive confinements 

at the Clinique Baudelocque in Paris. He found that 137 women 

engaged in fatiguing occupations (servants, cooks, etc.) and not 

resting during pregnancy, produced children with an average 

weight of 3,081 grammes; 115 women engaged in only slightly 

fatiguing occupations (dressmakers, milliners, etc.) and also not 

resting during pregnancy, had children with an average weight of 

3,130 grammes, a slight but significant difference, in view of 

the fact that the women of the first group were large and robust, 

while those of the second group were of slight and elegant build. 

Again, comparing groups of women who rested during pregnancy, it 

was found that the women accustomed to fatiguing work had 

children with an average weight of 3,319 grammes, while those 

accustomed to less fatiguing work had children with an average 

weight of 3,318 grammes. The difference between repose and 

non-repose is thus considerable, while it also enables robust 

women exercising a fatiguing occupation to catch up, though not 

to surpass, the frailer women exercising a less fatiguing 

occupation. We see, too, that even in the comparatively 

unfatiguing occupations of milliners, etc., rest during pregnancy 

still remains important, and cannot safely be dispensed with. 

"Society," Letourneux concludes, "must guarantee rest to women 

not well off during a part of pregnancy. It will be repaid the 

cost of doing so by the increased vigor of the children thus 

produced" (Letourneux, _De l'Influence de la Profession de la 

Mere sur le Poids de l'Enfant_, These de Paris, 1897). 

 

Dr. Dweira-Bernson (_Revue Pratique d'Obstetrique et de 

Pediatrie_, 1903, p. 370), compared four groups of pregnant women 

(servants with light work, servants with heavy work, farm girls, 

dressmakers) who rested for three months before confinement with 

four groups similarly composed who took no rest before 

confinement. In every group he found that the difference in the 

average weight of the child was markedly in favor of the women 

who rested, and it was notable that the greatest difference was 

found in the case of the farm girls who were probably the most 

robust and also the hardest worked. 

 

The usual time of gestation ranges between 274 and 280 days (or 

280 to 290 days from the last menstrual period), and occasionally 

a few days longer, though there is dispute as to the length of 

the extreme limit, which some authorities would extend to 300 

days, or even to 320 days (Pinard, in Richet's _Dictionnaire de 

Physiologie_, vol. vii, pp. 150-162; Taylor, _Medical 

Jurisprudence_, fifth edition, pp. 44, 98 et seq.; L.M. Allen, 

"Prolonged Gestation," _American Journal Obstetrics_, April, 

1907). It is possible, as Mueller suggested in 1898 in a These de 

Nancy, that civilization tends to shorten the period of 

gestation, and that in earlier ages it was longer than it is now. 

Such a tendency to premature birth under the exciting nervous 

influences of civilization would thus correspond, as Bouchacourt 

has pointed out (_La Grossesse_, p. 113), to the similar effect 

of domestication in animals. The robust countrywoman becomes 

transformed into the more graceful, but also more fragile, town 

woman who needs a degree of care and hygiene which the 

countrywoman with her more resistant nervous system can to some 


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