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Table of contents
PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

has long been lost and nothing remains unknown to them, but--they 

have preserved their hymens! That is for the sake of the future 

husband. Let no one dare to doubt their innocence with that 

unimpeachable evidence! And if another girl, who has passed her 

childhood in complete purity, now, with awakened senses and warm 

impetuous womanliness, gives herself to a man in love or even 

only in passion, they all stand up and scream that she is 

'dishonored!' And, not least, the prostituted girl with the 

hymen. It is she indeed who screams loudest and throws the 

biggest stones. Yet the 'dishonored' woman, who is sound and 

wholesome, need not fear to tell what she has done to the man who 

desires her in marriage, speaking as one human being to another. 

She has no need to blush, she has exercised her human rights, and 

no reasonable man will on that account esteem her the less" (Dr. 

H. Paul, "Die Ueberschaetzung der Jungfernschaft," _Geschlecht und 

Gesellschaft_, Bd. ii, p. 14, 1907). 

 

In a similar spirit writes F. Erhard (_Geschlecht und 

Gesellschaft_, Bd. i, p. 408): "Virginity in one sense has its 

worth, but in the ordinary sense it is greatly overestimated. 

Apart from the fact that a girl who possesses it may yet be 

thoroughly perverted, this over-estimation of virginity leads to 

the girl who is without it being despised, and has further 

resulted in the development of a special industry for the 

preparation, by means of a prudishly cloistral education, of 

girls who will bring to their husbands the peculiar dainty of a 

bride who knows nothing about anything. Naturally, this can only 

be achieved at the expense of any rational education. What the 

undeveloped little goose may turn into, no man can foresee." 

 

Freud (_Sexual-Probleme_, March, 1908) also points out the evil 

results of the education for marriage which is given to girls on 

the basis of this ideal of virginity. "Education undertakes the 

task of repressing the girl's sensuality until the time of 

betrothal. It not only forbids sexual relations and sets a high 

premium on innocence, but it also withdraws the ripening womanly 

individuality from temptation, maintaining a state of ignorance 

concerning the practical side of the part she is intended to play 

in life, and enduring no stirring of love which cannot lead to 

marriage. The result is that when she is suddenly permitted to 

fall in love by the authority of her elders, the girl cannot 

bring her psychic disposition to bear, and goes into marriage 

uncertain of her own feelings. As a consequence of this 

artificial retardation of the function of love she brings nothing 

but deception to the husband who has set all his desires upon 

her, and manifests frigidity in her physical relations with him." 

 

Senancour (_De l'Amour_, vol. i, p. 285) even believes that, when 

it is possible to leave out of consideration the question of 

offspring, not only will the law of chastity become equal for the 

two sexes, but there will be a tendency for the situation of the 

sexes to be, to some extent, changed. "Continence becomes a 

counsel rather than a precept, and it is in women that the 

voluptuous inclination will be regarded with most indulgence. Man 

is made for work; he only meets pleasure in passing; he must be 

content that women should occupy themselves with it more than he. 

It is men whom it exhausts, and men must always, in part, 

restrain their desires." 

 

As, however, we liberate ourselves from the bondage of a compulsory 


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