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Table of contents
PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

 

Some of the most typical of these early Christian romances are 

described as Gnostical in origin, with something of the germs of 

Manichaean dualism which were held in the rich and complex matrix 

of Gnosticism, while the spirit of these romances is also largely 

Montanist, with the combined chastity and ardor, the pronounced 

feminine tone due to its origin in Asia Minor, which marked 

Montanism. It cannot be denied, however, that they largely passed 

into the main stream of Christian tradition, and form an 

essential and important part of that tradition. (Renan, in his 

_Marc-Aurele_, Chs. IX and XV, insists on the immense debt of 

Christianity to Gnostic and Montanist contributions). A 

characteristic example is the story of "The Betrothed of India" 

in _Judas Thomas's Acts_ (Wright's _Apocryphal Acts_). Judas 

Thomas was sold by his master Jesus to an Indian merchant who 

required a carpenter to go with him to India. On disembarking at 

the city of Sandaruk they heard the sounds of music and singing, 

and learnt that it was the wedding-feast of the King's daughter, 

which all must attend, rich and poor, slaves and freemen, 

strangers and citizens. Judas Thomas went, with his new master, 

to the banquet and reclined with a garland of myrtle placed on 

his head. When a Hebrew flute-player came and stood over him and 

played, he sang the songs of Christ, and it was seen that he was 

more beautiful than all that were there and the King sent for him 

to bless the young couple in the bridal chamber. And when all 

were gone out and the door of the bridal chamber closed, the 

bridegroom approached the bride, and saw, as it were, Judas 

Thomas still talking with her. But it was our Lord who said to 

him, "I am not Judas, but his brother." And our Lord sat down on 

the bed beside the young people and began to say to them: 

"Remember, my children, what my brother spake with you, and know 

to whom he committed you, and know that if ye preserve yourselves 

from this filthy intercourse ye become pure temples, and are 

saved from afflictions manifest and hidden, and from the heavy 

care of children, the end whereof is bitter sorrow. For their 

sakes ye will become oppressors and robbers, and ye will be 

grievously tortured for their injuries. For children are the 

cause of many pains; either the King falls upon them or a demon 

lays hold of them, or paralysis befalls them. And if they be 

healthy they come to ill, either by adultery, or theft, or 

fornication, or covetousness, or vain-glory. But if ye will be 

persuaded by me, and keep yourselves purely unto God, ye shall 

have living children to whom not one of these blemishes and hurts 

cometh nigh; and ye shall be without care and without grief and 

without sorrow, and ye shall hope for the time when ye shall see 

the true wedding-feast." The young couple were persuaded, and 

refrained from lust, and our Lord vanished. And in the morning, 

when it was dawn, the King had the table furnished early and 

brought in before the bridegroom and bride. And he found them 

sitting the one opposite the other, and the face of the bride was 

uncovered and the bridegroom was very cheerful. The mother of the 

bride saith to her: "Why art thou sitting thus, and art not 

ashamed, but art as if, lo, thou wert married a long time, and 

for many a day?" And her father, too, said; "Is it thy great love 

for thy husband that prevents thee from even veiling thyself?" 

And the bride answered and said: "Truly, my father, I am in great 


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