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Table of contents
PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

the concomitants, and the results of love, we must still make the same 

confession to-day. We may, as some have done, attempt to explain love as a 

form of hunger and thirst, or as a force analogous to electricity, or as a 

kind of magnetism, or as a variety of chemical affinity, or as a vital 

tropism, but these explanations are nothing more than ways of expressing 

to ourselves the magnitude of the phenomenon we are in the presence of. 

 

What has always baffled men in the contemplation of sexual love is the 

seeming inadequacy of its cause, the immense discrepancy between the 

necessarily circumscribed region of mucous membrane which is the final 

goal of such love and the sea of world-embracing emotions to which it 

seems as the door, so that, as Remy de Gourmont has said, "the mucous 

membranes, by an ineffable mystery, enclose in their obscure folds all the 

riches of the infinite." It is a mystery before which the thinker and the 

artist are alike overcome. Donnay, in his play _L'Escalade_, makes a cold 

and stern man of science, who regards love as a mere mental disorder which 

can be cured like other disorders, at last fall desperately in love 

himself. He forces his way into the girl's room, by a ladder, at dead of 

night, and breaks into a long and passionate speech: "Everything that 

touches you becomes to me mysterious and sacred. Ah! to think that a thing 

so well known as a woman's body, which sculptors have modelled, which 

poets have sung of, which men of science like myself have dissected, that 

such a thing should suddenly become an unknown mystery and an infinite joy 

merely because it is the body of one particular woman--what insanity! And 

yet that is what I feel."[64] 

 

That love is a natural insanity, a temporary delusion which the individual 

is compelled to suffer for the sake of the race, is indeed an explanation 

that has suggested itself to many who have been baffled by this mystery. 

That, as we know, was the explanation offered by Schopenhauer. When a 

youth and a girl fall into each other's arms in the ecstacy of love they 

imagine that they are seeking their own happiness. But it is not so, said 

Schopenhauer; they are deluded by the genius of the race into the belief 

that they are seeking a personal end in order that they may be induced to 

effect a far greater impersonal end: the creation of the future race. The 

intensity of their passion is not the measure of the personal happiness 

they will secure but the measure of their aptitude for producing 

offspring. In accepting passion and renouncing the counsels of cautious 

prudence the youth and the girl are really sacrificing their chances of 

selfish happiness and fulfilling the larger ends of Nature. As 

Schopenhauer saw the matter, there was here no vulgar illusion. The lovers 

thought that they were reaching towards a boundlessly immense personal 

happiness; they were probably deceived. But they were deceived not because 

the reality was less than their imagination, but because it was more; 

instead of pursuing, as they thought, a merely personal end they were 

carrying on the creative work of the world, a task better left undone, as 

Schopenhauer viewed it, but a task whose magnitude he fully 

recognized.[65] 

 

It must be remembered that in the lower sense of deception, love may be, 

and frequently is, a delusion. A man may deceive himself, or be deceived 

by the object of his attraction, concerning the qualities that she 

possesses or fails to possess. In first love, occurring in youth, such 

deception is perhaps entirely normal, and in certain suggestible and 

inflammable types of people it is peculiarly apt to occur. This kind of 


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