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Table of contents
PREFACE
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.1
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.2
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.3
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.4
THE MOTHER AND HER CHILD-1.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.4
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.5
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.6
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.7
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.8
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.9
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.10
SEXUAL EDUCATION-2.11
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.1
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.2
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.3
SEXUAL EDUCATION AND NAKEDNESS-3.4
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.1
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.2
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.3
THE VALUATION OF SEXUAL LOVE-4.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.1
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.2
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.3
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.4
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.5
THE FUNCTION OF CHASTITY-5.6
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.1
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.2
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.3
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.4
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.5
THE PROBLEM OF SEXUAL ABSTINENCE-6.6
PROSTITUTION-7.1
PROSTITUTION-7.2
PROSTITUTION-7.3
PROSTITUTION-7.4
PROSTITUTION-7.5
PROSTITUTION-7.6
PROSTITUTION-7.7
PROSTITUTION-7.8
PROSTITUTION-7.9
PROSTITUTION-7.10
PROSTITUTION-7.11
PROSTITUTION-7.12
PROSTITUTION-7.13
PROSTITUTION-7.14
PROSTITUTION-7.15
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2

and held to be unworthy of public discussion and representation. 

It was in Magna Graecia rather than in Greece itself that men took 

interest in women, and it was not until the Alexandrian period, 

and notably in Asclepiades, Benecke maintains, that the love of 

women was regarded as a matter of life and death. Thereafter the 

conception of sexual love, in its romantic aspects, appears in 

European life. With the Celtic story of Tristram, as Gaston Paris 

remarks, it finally appears in the Christian European world of 

poetry as the chief point in human life, the great motive force 

of conduct. 

 

Romantic love failed, however, to penetrate the masses in Europe. 

In the sixteenth century, or whenever it was that the ballad of 

"Glasgerion" was written, we see it is assumed that a churl's 

relation to his mistress is confined to the mere act of sexual 

intercourse; he fails to kiss her on arriving or departing; it is 

only the knight, the man of upper class, who would think of 

offering that tender civility. And at the present day in, for 

instance, the region between East Friesland and the Alps, Bloch 

states (_Sexualleben unserer Zeit_, p. 29), following E.H. Meyer, 

that the word "love" is unknown among the masses, and only its 

coarse counterpart recognized. 

 

On the other side of the world, in Japan, sexual love seems to be 

in as great disrepute as it was in ancient Greece; thus Miss 

Tsuda, a Japanese head-mistress, and herself a Christian, remarks 

(as quoted by Mrs. Eraser in _World's Work and Play_, Dec., 

1906): "That word 'love' has been hitherto a word unknown among 

our girls, in the foreign sense. Duty, submission, 

kindness--these were the sentiments which a girl was expected to 

bring to the husband who had been chosen for her--and many happy, 

harmonious marriages were the result. Now, your dear sentimental 

foreign women say to our girls: 'It is wicked to marry without 

love; the obedience to parents in such a case is an outrage 

against nature and Christianity. If you love a man you must 

sacrifice everything to marry him.'" 

 

When, however, love is fully developed it becomes an enormously 

extended, highly complex emotion, and lust, even in the best 

sense of that word, becomes merely a cooerdinated element among 

many other elements. Herbert Spencer, in an interesting passage 

of his _Principles of Psychology_ (Part IV, Ch. VIII), has 

analyzed love into as many as nine distinct and important 

elements: (1) the physical impulse of sex; (2) the feeling for 

beauty; (3) affection; (4) admiration and respect; (5) love of 

approbation; (6) self-esteem; (7) proprietary feeling; (8) 

extended liberty of action from the absence of personal barriers; 

(9) exaltation of the sympathies. "This passion," he concludes, 

"fuses into one immense aggregate most of the elementary 

excitations of which we are capable." 

 

It is scarcely necessary to say that to define sexual love, or even to 

analyze its components, is by no means to explain its mystery. We seek to 

satisfy our intelligence by means of a coherent picture of love, but the 

gulf between that picture and the emotional reality must always be 

incommensurable and impassable. "There is no word more often pronounced 

than that of love," wrote Bonstetten many years ago, "yet there is no 

subject more mysterious. Of that which touches us most nearly we know 

least. We measure the march of the stars and we do not know how we love." 

And however expert we have become in detecting and analyzing the causes, 


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